Scott Horton Interviews Maya Berry

Posted by Scott Horton on February 28, 2011

Maya Berry of the Arab American Institute discusses the March 2nd briefing for congressional staffers, “Islamophobia: A Challenge to American Pluralism,” designed as a counterpoint to Rep. Peter King’s hearings on Muslim “radicalization;” the very lucrative business – the new “Red Scare” – of whipping up fear of Muslims; and the knee-jerk response of many Americans to scary sounding Arabic words they don’t know the meaning of.

Listen to the interview

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Middle East; Obama’s Budget; Entertainment News

Posted by Eric Michael Dyson Show on February 23, 2011

The Middle East continues to be rocked by unrest in a number of countries. What started in Tunisia last month has spread to Egypt, then Yemen, Bahrain, and Libya, where there has been substantial violence and a call for long-time leader Moammar Gadhafi to step down. James Zogby, founder and president of the Arab American Institute in Washington, D.C., and author of Arab Voices: What They Are Saying to Us, and Why It Matters, examines the turmoil in that volatile region.

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Change in Egypt Focuses Attention on Other Countries in Middle East

Posted by Carolyn Presutti on February 17, 2011

New anti-government protests are springing up in the Middle East in the wake the massive protests and leadership change in Egypt. And that presents both opportunities and obstacles for U.S. foreign policy in the region.One country, one people's demand for change.  The U.S. government initially reacted with caution to the Egyptian protests -- until near the end, when President Barack Obama made it clear that he supported a new government. "The people of Egypt have spoken.  Their voices have been heard," he said.

And others are being heard -- across the Middle East. That leaves the Obama administration to decide...

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Mubarak’s Fall Spurs Calls To Rethink U.S. Policy

Posted by Jackie Northam on February 15, 2011

As Egypt's president, Hosni Mubarak was a key U.S. ally for three decades, but his sudden departure from power has shaken the fundamentals of U.S. strategy in the Middle East, leaving some analysts to believe now is the time to rethink those policies.When Egyptian protesters took to the streets Jan. 25, they created a deep fissure in the U.S. strategy for the region. By the time Mubarak finally relinquished his grip on power, some 18 days later, long-held policies that Washington believed help ensure stability in the region had been upended.Thomas Pickering, a career ambassador now with the National Committee...

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Mubarak’s Fall Spurs Calls To Rethink U.S. Policy

Posted by Jackie Northam on February 15, 2011

As Egypt's president, Hosni Mubarak was a key U.S. ally for three decades, but his sudden departure from power has shaken the fundamentals of U.S. strategy in the Middle East, leaving some analysts to believe now is the time to rethink those policies.When Egyptian protesters took to the streets Jan. 25, they created a deep fissure in the U.S. strategy for the region. By the time Mubarak finally relinquished his grip on power, some 18 days later, long-held policies that Washington believed help ensure stability in the region had been upended.Thomas Pickering, a career ambassador now with the National Committee...

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Egyptians in U.S. already looking toward the future

Posted by Associated Press on February 11, 2011

NEW YORK — Waves of celebration rippled out of Egypt and washed onto America's shores Friday, with Egyptian-Americans already looking to the future after the departure of President Hosni Mubarak and his three decades of authoritarian rule.

Three weeks after protests began in Cairo and for a time seemed futile, Sherine El-Abd found herself sobbing with joy at her home in Clifton, N.J. A board member of the Washington-based nonprofit Arab American Institute, she predicted that the military in Egypt will "oversee a clean, democratic election."

"Listen, if the person with the thickest skin and the densest brain in...

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Egyptians in U.S. already looking toward the future

Posted by Associated Press on February 11, 2011

NEW YORK — Waves of celebration rippled out of Egypt and washed onto America's shores Friday, with Egyptian-Americans already looking to the future after the departure of President Hosni Mubarak and his three decades of authoritarian rule.

Three weeks after protests began in Cairo and for a time seemed futile, Sherine El-Abd found herself sobbing with joy at her home in Clifton, N.J. A board member of the Washington-based nonprofit Arab American Institute, she predicted that the military in Egypt will "oversee a clean, democratic election."

"Listen, if the person with the thickest skin and the densest brain in...

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International Arab expert tells crowd in Chestnut Hill that Arabs and Americans have more in common

Posted by Lou Mancinelli on February 09, 2011

Dr. James Zogby, founder and president of the Washington D.C. based Arab American Institute discussed his new book “Arab Voices – What They Are Saying To Us, and Why It Matters,” (Palgrave Macmillan, October 2010) Monday evening at the Woodmere Art Museum as part of the speaker series of the Chestnut Hill Book Festival.

Zogby’s research, he said, is full of illuminating contradictions between American perceptions and fact about Arabs — people living in the 22 Arab language-speaking countries that stretch from northern Africa to central Asia. Arabs, Zogby said, actually like Americans and share many of the same...

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International Arab expert tells crowd in Chestnut Hill that Arabs and Americans have more in common

Posted by Lou Mancinelli on February 09, 2011

Dr. James Zogby, founder and president of the Washington D.C. based Arab American Institute discussed his new book “Arab Voices – What They Are Saying To Us, and Why It Matters,” (Palgrave Macmillan, October 2010) Monday evening at the Woodmere Art Museum as part of the speaker series of the Chestnut Hill Book Festival.

Zogby’s research, he said, is full of illuminating contradictions between American perceptions and fact about Arabs — people living in the 22 Arab language-speaking countries that stretch from northern Africa to central Asia. Arabs, Zogby said, actually like Americans and share many of the same...

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Arab Expert James Zogby: They Don’t Hate Us

Posted by Henry Reske and Kathleen Walter on February 05, 2011

Mideast Arabs don’t hate the United States — and they actually have much in common with average U.S. residents, Arab American Institute President James Zogby tells Newsmax.TV. They admire Americans’ values of freedom and democracy, as well as the U.S. culture, he said.“The reality is they go to bed at night worried about their jobs, wake in the morning thinking about whether their kids get the education they need, whether they’ll have healthcare for their parents,” said Zogby, author of “Arab Voices: What They Are Saying to Us and Why It Matters.”“They’re really like us. When they come home and...

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