Stepping up for Susiya: The Power of the American Constituency

Posted by Guest on September 19, 2017 in Blog

Local elementary school students demonstrated their solidarity with Susiya by participating in Pinwheels for Peace ahead of the International Day of Peace by handing out pinwheels to those in attendance of the briefing By Sarah Seniuk Susiya is a small Palestinian village located in the southern Hebron Hills, and has been a particularly sought-after area of land by Israel. The villagers were first displaced in 1986 for an archaeological dig, and since have faced

Read more


Washington Watch: Senate Bill 720: Making It a Crime to Support Palestinian Human Rights

Posted on August 12, 2017 in Washington Watch

by James J. Zogby It is fascinating to watch some US senators tripping over themselves as they attempt to defend their support for or opposition to proposed legislation that would make it a federal crime to support the international campaign to Boycott, Divest, or Sanction (BDS) Israel for its continued occupation of Palestinian lands. What ties these officials up in knots are their efforts to square the circle of their "love of Israel", their opposition to BDS, their support for a "two-state solution", and their commitment to free speech.    The bill in question, S720, was introduced on...

Read more


BDS Battle Heats Up

Last week, we told you about the ACLU’s letter urging members of Congress to refrain from cosponsoring the so-called “Israel Anti-Boycott Act” because American citizens have a constitutional right to boycott Israel if they want to (duh!). Subsequently, Senators Ben Cardin (D-MD) and Rob Portman (R-OH) responded to the ACLU, insisting that they were blowing things out of proportion when they said what we've been saying for years now, and claiming the bill “does [not] punish individuals or companies from [sic] refusing to do business with Israel based on their own political beliefs.” That’s...


When Facts are Upsetting

Given the current political climate and congressional efforts to defund the Palestinian Authority over concerns about terrorism (everything wrong with these efforts is explained here), one would expect Trump’s State Department to sing the same tune. But it looks like a level of independence and common sense is still intact in the State Department, which just put out a report on terrorism that threw some who, dare we say, maybe less informed for a loop. The report praises the Palestinian Authority’s efforts to prevent violence and terror attacks, noting they thwarted hundreds of attacks,...


Fighting for Truth: Challenging the Anti-Palestinian Bias in the Media

Posted by Guest on July 27, 2017 in Blog

By Sarah Decker  “2 Israeli soldiers killed in Gaza clash: Death toll tops 330 as Hamas militants step up attacks.” This July 2014 headline in the Washington Post illustrates the increasing reality of media bias that undermines Palestinian deaths and manipulates American perceptions of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. Political analyst Omar Baddar cites headlines like this as one of the main sources of the widespread misinformation surrounding this political fault-line. The article, reporting on the 2014 Israel-Gaza conflict, presents a narrative that focuses on the “inflammatory and violent tactics” of...

Read more

Facts and Myths of US Funding of Terrorism in Israel and Palestine

Posted by Omar Baddar on July 21, 2017 in Blog

Ending US financial backing for attacks on civilians in Israel and Palestine is a noble cause, and deserves the backing of all Americans. But when the Senate Foreign Relations Committee attempted to address the matter with the Taylor Force Act, they did it with the wrong framing and focus, advocating cutting US funding for the Palestinian Authority (PA) for what is misleadingly described as the PA’s policy of “rewards for terrorism”. Before addressing why this characterization is misleading, let me first explain why the entire conversation is framed terribly.Elephant in...

Read more


← Previous  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11    95  96  Next →