The question of Palestine at the United Nations

Posted on January 03, 2011

The United Nations has been working on the question of Palestine since the first special session of the General Assembly on 28 April 1947, which established a body to investigate the issue and return with its recommendations. Over 60 years later, the range of the UN's work on the issue has continued to adapt to meet new challenges and address changing realities on the ground. Read the full History of the Question of Palestine.

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Impressions of America (2004)

Posted on October 12, 2010

In June 2004, Zogby International surveyed almost 3,300 Arabs living in Morocco, Saudi Arabia, Jordan, Lebanon, the United Arab Emirates and Egypt. The poll was commissioned by the Arab American Institute as a follow-up to the 2002 “Impressions of America” study. Questions in this second “Impressions of America” poll focused on how Arabs viewAmerica and how Arabs learn about America.

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Related Material: It's Still the Policy, Stupid

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Arab Opinions on President Obama‘s First 100 Days: A Six Nation Survey

Posted on October 12, 2010

On Attitudes toward President Obama and the United States: Since President Barack Obama’s election, there has been a change in Arab attitude toward the United States. In Saudi Arabia (KSA), the UAE, Lebanon and Morocco, over 50 percent of the public polled say their attitude toward the United States is more positive as a result of Barack Obama being elected President. In Jordan and Egypt, a majority remains neutral with only about one-in-four saying their attitude has changed for the better. The UAE, however, is the only Arab country where a majority of respondents hold a favorable opinion of the...

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2010 Six Nation Poll

Posted on October 12, 2010

Results for this survey are based on face-to-face interviews conducted under the direction of Zogby International. All surveys are based on urban samples except in Lebanon where the sample was nationwide.

The tables below show the margin of sampling error based on all interviews conducted in that country. For results based on the full sample in a given country, one can say with 95% confidence that the error attributable to sampling and other random effects is plus or minus the margin of error. In addition to sampling error, one should bear in mind that question wording and practical difficulties in...

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Arab American Voters in 2010: Their Identity and Political Concerns

Posted on October 05, 2010

The Arab American Institute commissioned Zogby International to conduct a telephone poll of 404 Arab Americans nationwide. Samples were randomly drawn over national cds using Zogby International's list of Arab surnames. Zogby International surveys employ sampling strategies in which selection probabilities are proportional to population size within area codes and exchanges. Up to six calls are made to reach a sampled phone number. Cooperation rates are calculated using one of AAPOR’s approved methodologies and are comparable to other professional public opinion surveys conducted using similar sampling strategies.2 Weighting by country of origin, religion, born in US, age, party, gender is...

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American Views on Arab and Muslim Americans

Posted on October 05, 2010

Zogby International was commissioned by Dr. James Zogby to conduct an online survey of 2100 adults. A sampling of Zogby International's online panel, which is representative of the adult population of the US, was invited to participate. Slight weights were added to region, party, age, race, religion, gender, education to more accurately reflect the population. The margin of error is +/- 2.2 percentage points. Margins of error are higher in sub-groups. The MOE calculation is for sampling error only.

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AAI Issue Brief: National Security Entry-Exit Registration System (NSEERS)

Posted on August 16, 2010

National Security Entry-Exit Registration System (NSEERS)Discussion Points: The National Security Entry-Exit Registration System (NSEERS) program was intended to track non-immigrants and serve as a counterterrorism tool. The most controversial aspect of NSEERS was a “domestic” component that solicited registrations from more than 80,000 males who were inside the United States on temporary visas from Muslim-majority countries. NSEERS was poorly conceived, badly managed, and has been a waste of government time and resources. Instead of an effective national security tool, NSEERS has: created a second-class status for Arabs and Muslims and their families in the United States fostered...

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AAI Issue Brief: Enhanced TSA Screening Practices

Posted on August 16, 2010

Discussion Points: In response to the attempted attack on Northwest Flight 293 in December 2009, the Administration has conducted a review of transportation safety and aviation that includes troubling reports that individuals traveling from or through Afghanistan, Algeria, Cuba, Iraq, Iran, Lebanon, Libya, Nigeria, Pakistan, Saudi Arabia, Somalia, Sudan, Syria, and Yemen will be automatically subjected to enhanced screening procedures, including full body searches and luggage inspection, before boarding inbound flights to the United States. Mandating secondary screening for every traveler from select Muslim-majority countries across the Middle East and Africa (Cuba is the lone exception), without indication of suspicious...

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AAI Issue Brief: Search and Seizure at U.S. Borders

Posted on August 13, 2010

Search and Seizure at U.S. Borders Discussion Points: It was disclosed in 2008 that the Department of Homeland Security Customs and Border Patrol (CBP) may confiscate personal electronic equipment, including laptop computers and handheld devices, from travelers crossing U.S. borders without evidence or reasonable indication of wrongdoing. Based on the standing guidelines on racial profiling, Arab American travelers could be targeted for confiscation of electronic devices during secondary screening on the basis of race, religion or national origin as sufficient evidence for suspicion. Additionally, information collected from personal electronic devices may be shared with other federal agencies, as well as state...

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AAI Issue Brief: Profiling Based on Race, Ethnicity, Religion, and National Origin

Posted on August 13, 2010

Profiling Based on Race, Ethnicity, Religion, and National Origin Discussion Points:  The Domestic Investigative Operational Guidelines (DIOGs), revised in 2008 by the Department of Justice, grant the FBI, DHS, and other agencies the authority to investigate Americans without any evidence of wrongdoing, encouraging instead systemic ethnic and religious profiling to determine the basis for opening a national security investigation. Despite assurances by the FBI that the revised guidelines “will be audited and enforced through a rigorous compliance mechanism, [and] are designed to ensure that FBI assessments and investigations are subject to responsible review and approval,” the loophole for national security...

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