How You Can Play A Role In The Second Debate

Posted by Mahamed Omar on October 05, 2016 in Blog

The second Presidential debate between Secretary Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump will be on this Sunday, October 9th at 9 PM Eastern. Taking place in the form of a town hall meeting, this second debate is expected to play a larger role in shaping the later stages of the election cycle and offers citizens an opportunity to play a role. Half of the questions will be posed directly by citizen participants, and the other half will be posed by moderators Martha Raddatz of ABC and Anderson Cooper of CNN.  Americans are able to submit and vote on questions online at www.PresidentialOpenQuestions.com. Both ABC and CNN have agreed to consider the 30 most popular queries when they jointly plan their debate questions. The debate participants in the audience will be uncommitted voters selected by the Gallup Organization. 

For a re-cap of the first presidential debate, click here.

We shared information on what the candidates have said about issues we expected to arise during the first presidential debate – and many of the topics were in fact discussed over the course of the 95-minute debate. That includes the government’s use of watch lists, profiling, surveillance, and domestic countering violent extremism programs. We’ve provided a brief snap shot of some of the candidates’ statements from the first debate and how AAI views the issues. [AAI, 9/27/16]

Vice Presidential candidates Tim Kaine and Mike Pence debated Tuesday night for their only debate of election season. NPR's provided a transcript and fact check of the debate, click here to read more.

Vice Presidential candidates Tim Kaine and Mike Pence debated Tuesday night for their only official matchup  of the election season. NPR's politics team, with help from reporters and editors who cover national security, immigration, business, foreign policy and more, live annotated the debate. Portions of the debate with added analysis are underlined in yellow, followed by context and fact checks. [NPR, 10/4/16]