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Dr. Zogby

If the U.S. Wants Arabs as Partners, We Must Treat Them As Such

The U.S. allies in the Gulf have long been concerned not only with Iran's nuclear ambitions, but more importantly with the Islamic Republic's regional ambitions and its meddlesome intrusion into affairs in the Arab region. Statements from Tehran boasting that they now have sit in capitals in Baghdad, Damascus, Beirut, and Sanaa, weigh heavy on the collective Arab consciousness. Read More »

Acknowledging the Armenian Genocide

In less than two weeks we will commemorate the 100th anniversary of the Armenian Genocide. Armenian Remembrance Day, April 24th, recalls the horrifying events that resulted in the deaths of more than one million Armenians and the forced expulsion and ethnic cleansing of many more from their ancestral homeland at the hands of Turkish nationalists. Read More »

Preying on Anti-Arab Bias

Delta Airlines is leading an effort to petition the US government to sanction Etihad Airlines, Emirates Airlines, and Qatar Air. They charge that these three airlines have received government subsidies and are unfairly competing with US carriers resulting in a loss of jobs for American workers.  Read More »

The Palestinian Arab Citizens of Israel: Pointing the Way Forward

The success of the Palestinian Arab citizens of Israel did not come easy. After 1948 when Israelis were celebrating what Ben Gurion called the "double miracle" of a state that was larger and had less Arabs, the 160,000 Arabs who remained in the "Jewish State" faced extreme hardships. Read More »

Naked Bibi

In the lead up to Israel's March 17th election, Prime Minister Benjamin (Bibi) Netanyahu, fearful that he might lose his reelection bid, threw caution to the wind making blatant appeals to scare voters into returning him to office. He did so not caring who he alienated or what might be the consequences of his behavior. I have always argued that in the animal kingdom there is no creature more dangerous than a panicking politician and, in the last few days, Bibi was one such creature. Read More »

Killing Off Myths

What many Arabs understand is that important parts of their world appear to be spinning dangerously out of control and that an intransigent Israel and an aggressive Iran are emboldened and ascendant. What they do not understand is why, in the midst of these threats and challenges, America's role is either absent or less than decisive. And precisely because many Arabs stubbornly hold on to myths about America's wisdom and power, they conclude that the unraveling and the threats must be by design. Read More »

An Ugly Week in Washington

If "l'affaire Netanyahu" weren't bad enough, Senate Republican Leader Mitch McConnell added insult to injury when he announced that early next week he will move for a vote on a bill requiring the White House to secure Congressional review and approval of any agreement concluded between the P5+1 negotiators and Iran. Read More »

Netanyahu’s Legacy: A Fractured Israel and a Divided America

In a few days, Israel's Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu will mount the podium of the U.S. Congress to speak before a joint session of the House and Senate. He will use the occasion to blast Iran and issue dire warnings about the current US-led negotiations designed to limit Iran's nuclear program. Read More »

Obama: “Pitch Perfect”

I must admit that I was somewhat skeptical as I approached last week's "White House Summit on Countering Violent Extremism" (CVE). I was concerned that it might end up being nothing more than a "box-checking" exercise. I was troubled that it might be perceived as targeting American Muslims and fostering a sense of increased alienation for some, while at the same time feeding the sense of suspicion that could result in a spike in hate crimes against Muslims. Read More »

Obama: Sound Theology and Smart Politics

President Obama's remarks, two weeks ago, at the annual National Prayer Breakfast were theologically sound and politically smart. In spite of this, his comments set off a storm of criticism from conservative critics who took him to task for both his theology and his politics. While I cannot read their hearts, their rhetoric was so predictable and so harsh, that I suspect some were prompted by a mixture of blind ideology and anti-Muslim animus, coupled with a tinge of racism. More to the point, the President's critics are just plain wrong-- theologically and politically.  Read More »

Jindal: From Rhodes Scholar to Dangerous Demagogue

A few weeks back, Louisiana Governor Bobby Jindal delivered a speech to the Henry Jackson Society in London focusing on the dangers "radical Islam" poses to the world's "freedom loving people". Far from a serious discussion, the speech amounted to little more than a dangerous mix of trite sloganeering and reckless jingoism. Jindal is no simple-minded demagogue like Sarah Palin or Michele Bachman. Because he is a Rhodes Scholar and a presidential aspirant, one supposes that he thought through his remarks. Read More »

An Early Look at the 2016 Contest

The election season has just begun and for those who have a consuming passion for presidential politics, the 2016 cycle promises to be a delight. A few months back, pundits were writing about the likelihood of a Hillary Clinton/Jeb Bush contest, but that speculation was clearly premature. While it appears that Mrs. Clinton will have little trouble winning the Democratic nomination, should she decide to run, the GOP contest is shaping up as a free-for-all. Read More »

Boehner/Netanyahu: “So Smart, They’re Stupid”

When I was growing up, I remember a saying that was used to describe the behavior of persons who were so cocky that they did really dumb things -- "He's so smart, he's stupid." I thought of this expression when I heard Speaker of the House of Representatives, John Boehner, announce that he had invited Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu to address a joint session of Congress in order to challenge President Obama's handling of "the grave threats of radical Islam and Iran." Read More »

Were the Murders at Charlie Hebdo Really About Islam?

The perpetrators of the horror at Charlie Hebdo were not devout Muslims outraged by insults directed at their faith. They were not motivated by religious piety, nor did they seek to strike a blow at "freedom of expression". Rather they were crude political actors who planned an act of terror--seeking to create the greatest possible impact. They were murderers, plain and simple. Read More »

Syria: The Way Forward, Without Illusions

It should be clear after four bloody years in Syria that if we are to make any progress moving forward, it is necessary to shed illusions and fantasies that have shaped too much of the discussion about the conflict. From the beginning, it was inevitable that this conflict, however it began, would morph into a proxy war between Iran and those who were deeply concerned by Iran's hegemonic ambitions. Read More »

A Bad End to a Bad Year

The closing weeks of 2014 spelled disaster for US leadership and the rule of law. During the last two weeks of December, the US countered three different efforts designed to affirm Palestinian rights. It was unfortunate since in doing so the US undercut its stated commitments to uphold the rule of law in international relations and to support a non-violent resolution to the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. Read More »

The Silent Cry of Bethlehem

Bethlehem has always loomed large in our imagination. For generations, the feelings evoked by this town have been captured in multiple art forms, serving to inspire both believers and non-believers with its message of hope and the joyful promise of new life. For those who do not know the place, Bethlehem possesses a timeless quality, derived from these artistic creations. It is a place of mystery and contradictions. Read More »

The Unraveling of the Arab Spring Narrative

Four years ago, Tunisia and the Egypt erupted in broad popular revolts. At first, analysts, Arab and Westerners alike, were confounded. When Libya, Bahrain, Yemen and Syria followed, in short order, the upheavals came to be described as the "Arab Spring" -- the assumption being that what was occurring in the Middle East would unfold in a manner reminiscent of the rapid transformations that took place in Eastern and Central Europe following the collapse of the Soviet Union. Read More »

Eric Holder: Profiling Continues

I first met Eric Holder during the Clinton years when he was serving as Deputy Attorney General. Back then, my community was deeply troubled by FBI harassment, the government's use of "secret evidence" to detain individuals, and profiling of Muslim or Arab-looking individuals at airports around the country. Read More »

‘Protect and Serve’ or ‘In Your Face’

In 1971, I was working at a Boy's Club in the Germantown section of Philadelphia running an after-school program. One day, the Police Athletic League representative dropped off a pile of coloring books for the younger kids. On the cover was a picture of a policeman walking hand-in-hand with a little girl, clearly (or so I thought) helping her across the street. My assumption, however, wasn't shared by 7-year-old Tanya. The minute she was handed her book she shouted out: "Oh, oh, she's in trouble. He's taking her away to jail." Read More »

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