Hillary Clinton

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www.hillaryclinton.com   

Hillary Clinton, a Yale Law School graduate, worked for the Children’s Defense Fund and advised the Judiciary Committee of the House of Representatives prior to her husband Bill Clinton being elected Governor of Arkansas in 1978. She was First Lady of Arkansas from 1979 to 1992, during which she became a partner at Rose Law Firm and led several business ventures. In 1992 Hillary Clinton became First Lady of the United States when Bill Clinton was elected. As First Lady, she chaired the Task Force on National Healthcare Reform among many other duties. Hillary was elected to the U.S. Senate from New York, where she served two terms. In the 2008 Presidential election she ran unsuccessfully against President Barack Obama. President Obama appointed Hillary U.S. Secretary of State, where she served from 2008 to 2012. Hillary announced her campaign for the 2016 Democratic nomination on Twitter in April 2015. 

Vice Presidential Running Mate

Senator Tim Kaine

Tim Kaine graduated from the University of Missouri, and earned a law degree from Harvard Law School during which he interrupted his studies to work for nine months at a Jesuit mission in Honduras. Upon completion of Harvard Law, Kaine entered private practice and became a lecturer at the University of Richmond School of Law. He was first elected to public office in 1994, when he won a seat on the Richmond, Virginia City Council. He was then elected mayor of Richmond in 1998, serving in that position until 2001 when he was elected Lieutenant Governor of Virginia. Kaine was elected governor of Virginia in 2005, serving until 2010. He served as chairman of the Democratic National Committee from 2009 to 2011, and then decided to run for the vacant U.S. Senate seat, an election he won. Senator Kaine is presently serving in the Senate and selected by Hillary Clinton as her Vice Presidential running mate on July 22nd. On July 27, 2016 Senator Kaine officially accepted the Democratic nomination. 

On the Issues

AAI tracks statements, non-statements, and the track records of each presidential candidate on the issues we care about most. Click on an issue to read what Hillary Clinton has said on the campaign trail. For our take on why these are the 12 issues that are most important to our community, read here.

 

Foreign Policy     

Domestic Policy

   

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U.S. Role in the Middle East 

Voting Rights 

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U.S. Response to ISIL

Civil Rights + Civil Liberties

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Syria 

Surveillance

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Israel/Palestine 

Community Policing

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Lebanon

Bigoted Speech

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Iran Negotiations 

Immigration Reform

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Key Advisors

  • Huma Abedin: Vice Chairwoman. Abedin has become an integral part of Clinton’s inner circle. She is Hillary’s “Body Woman”, and serves as both a personal assistant and trusted advisor. She remained close to Clinton even during her State Department tenure, and provides valuable institutional memory for the campaign, having worked for Hillary in a similar role in on her 2008 campaign. Abedin was raised in Saudi Arabia and is a practicing Muslim. She came to the United States at 18 to attend the George Washington University, where she began interning for Hillary Clinton at the White House during Bill Clinton’s administration.
  • Maya Harris: Senior Policy Advisor. Formerly a Senior Fellow at the Clinton-allied Center for American Progress, Maya Harris is a lawyer with history working on many social justice issues. Harris was Vice President for Democracy, Rights and Justice at the Ford Foundation, before which she served as the Executive Director of the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) of Northern California.
  • Jim Margolis: Media Advisor. Margolis is a long time political advisor to Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-NV) and served under President Obama as Senior Advisor for one year. He is a Partner at GMMB, a Democratic media strategy group which rose to acclaim for its work on the 2008 Obama campaign.
  • Robby Mook: Campaign Manager. Mook is a long time Democratic operative who was a part of 2008 presidential campaign and has also served as executive director of the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee. Mook is also known for his work on the successful 2013 campaign of Terry McAuliffe for Virginia governor; McAuliffe is a close Clinton ally and booster.
  • Jennifer Palmieri: Communications Director. Before joining the Clinton campaign, Palimieri served as Communications Director for the White House. She previously worked in the Bill Clinton White House and at the Center for American Progress.
  • John Podesta: Campaign Chairman. Podesta formerly served as Chief of Staff for President Bill Clinton. After leaving the White House, Podesta founder the Center for American Progress, a liberal think tank in Washington, DC. Podesta returned to the White House to serve as a Counselor to President Barack Obama. He left that post to join Clinton's 2016 campaign.
  • Jake Sullivan: Top Foreign Policy Adviser. He previously served as Deputy Policy Director on Hillary’s 2008 presidential campaign then was critical part of Hillary Clinton's State Department inner circle. He was also a prominent member of her State Department team. Sullivan has received significant publicity for his role in facilitating the groundwork for a nuclear deal with Iran. Mr. Sullivan is widely speculated to be a likely candidate for the job of National Security Advisor in the event Hillary Clinton is elected President.
  • National Security Leadership Alliance: Center for American Progress, former Secretary of State Madeleine Albright, former CIA Director Leon Panetta, former U.S. Senator from Michigan Carl Levin, and former Attorney General Eric Holder

Statements 

The U.S. Role in the Middle East

"So we’ve got to do everything we can to vacuum up intelligence from Europe, from the Middle East. That means we've got to work more closely with our allies. And that’s something that Donald has been very dismissive of. Working with NATO, the longest military alliance in the history of the world, to really turn our attention to terrorism. We’re working with our friends in the Middle East, many of which, as you know, are Muslim majority nations.” (September 26, 2016 – 1st Presidential Debate)

According to the Clinton campaign, during a meeting with Egyptian President Sisi, the two had “a constructive discussion about bilateral ties and cooperation on a wide range of issues, including counterterrorism. Secretary Clinton emphasized the importance of respect for rule of law and human rights to Egypt’s future progress. Secretary Clinton called for the release of U.S. citizen Aya Hijazi and raised concerns about prosecution of Egyptian human rights organizations and activists.” (September 19, 2016 - campaign statement)

“With respect to Libya, again, there’s no difference between my opponent and myself. He’s on record extensively supporting intervention in Libya, when Gadhafi was threatening to massacre his population. I put together a coalition that included NATO, included the Arab League, and we were able to save lives. We did not lose a single American in that action. And I think taking that action was the right decision. Not taking it, and permitting there to be an ongoing civil war in Libya, would have been as dangerous and threatening as what we are now seeing in Syria.” (September 7, 2016 – NBC Commander-In-Chief Forum)

"The United States is an exceptional nation. I believe we are still Lincoln’s last, best hope of Earth. We’re still Reagan’s shining city on a hill. We’re still Robert Kennedy’s great, unselfish, compassionate country…. And part of what makes America an exceptional nation, is that we are also an indispensable nation. In fact, we are the indispensable nation. People all over the world look to us and follow our lead. When we say America is exceptional, it doesn’t mean that people from other places don’t feel deep national pride, just like we do. It means that we recognize America’s unique and unparalleled ability to be a force for peace and progress, a champion for freedom and opportunity. Our power comes with a responsibility to lead, humbly, thoughtfully, and with a fierce commitment to our values. Because, when America fails to lead, we leave a vacuum that either causes chaos or other countries or networks rush in to fill the void. So no matter how hard it gets, no matter how great the challenge, America must lead. The question is how we lead. What kind of ideas, strategies, and tactics we bring to our leadership. American leadership means standing with our allies because our network of allies is part of what makes us exceptional." (August 31, 2016 – American Legion National Convention speech)

"American leadership means leading with our values in pursuance of our interests, in protection of our security. At our best the United States is the global force for freedom, justice and human dignity. We celebrate our diversity." (August 31, 2016 – American Legion National Convention speech)

"We stand up to regimes that abuse human rights. We stand up for religious and ethnic minorities, for women, for people with disabilities and we comport ourselves with honor." (August 31, 2016 – American Legion National Convention speech)

"Now, the third area that demands attention is preventing radicalization and countering efforts by ISIS and other international terrorist networks to recruit in the United States and Europe. For starters, it is long past time for the Saudis, the Qataris and the Kuwaitis and others to stop their citizens from funding extremist organizations. And they should stop supporting radical schools and mosques around the world that have set too many young people on a path towards extremism." (June 13, 2016 - Rally in Cleveland, OH)

"The attack in Orlando makes it even more clear, we cannot contain this threat. We must defeat it. And the good news is that the coalition effort in Syria and Iraq has made recent gains in the last months. So we should keep the pressure on ramping up the air campaign, accelerating support for our friends fighting to take and hold ground and pushing our partners in the region to do even more." (June 13, 2016 - Rally in Cleveland, OH)

“America’s network of allies is part of what makes us exceptional. And our allies deliver for us every day." (June 2, 2016 - Rally in San Diego, CA)

“It’s a choice between a fearful America that’s less secure and less engaged with the world, and a strong, confident America that leads to keep our country safe and our economy growing.” (June 2, 2016 - Rally in San Diego, CA)

“I believe in strong alliances; clarity in dealing with our rivals; and a rock-solid commitment to the values that have always made America great. And I believe with all my heart that America is an exceptional country – that we’re still, in Lincoln’s words, the last, best hope of earth. We are not a country that cowers behind walls. We lead with purpose, and we prevail. And if America doesn’t lead, we leave a vacuum – and that will either cause chaos, or other countries will rush in to fill the void. Then they’ll be the ones making the decisions about your lives and jobs and safety – and trust me, the choices they make will not be to our benefit. That is not an outcome we can live with.” (June 2, 2016 - Rally in San Diego, CA)

"The Libyan people deserve a chance at democracy and self- government. And I, as president, will keep trying to give that to them."  (April 14, 2016 - CNN Democratic Debate in Brooklyn)

"And we must work closely with Israel and other partners to cut off the flow of money and arms from Iran to Hezbollah. If the Arab League can designate all of Hezbollah as a terrorist organization, surely it is time for our friends in Europe and the rest of the international community to do so as well and to do that now."  (March 21, 2016 - AIPAC conference speech)

"We saw what happened in Egypt. I cautioned about a quick overthrow of Mubarak, and we now are back with basically an army dictatorship. This is a part of the world where the United States has tried to play two different approaches. One, work with the tough men, the dictators, for our own benefit and promote democracy. That's a hard road to walk. But I think it's the right road for us to try to travel." (December 19, 2015 - 3rd Democratic primary debate)

"And demonizing Muslims also feeds a narrative that jihadists use to recruit new followers around the world, that the United States is at war with Islam.  As both the Pentagon and the FBI have said in the past week, we cannot in any way lend credence to that twisted idea.  This is not a clash of civilizations.  It’s a clash between civilization and barbarism and that’s how it must be seen and fought." (December 2015, University of Minnesota speech)

“Now there has been a lot of turmoil and trouble as they have tried to deal with these radical elements which you find in this arc of instability from North Africa to Afghanistan.” (November 2015, CBS Democratic Debate)

“I have said the invasion of Iraq was a mistake. But I think if we're ever going to really tackle the problems posed by jihadi extreme terrorism we need to understand it…” (November 2015, CBS Democratic Debate)

“I applaud the administration because they are engaged in talks right now with the Russians to make it clear that they've got to be part of the solution to try to end that bloody conflict. And, to -- provide safe zones so that people are not going to have to be flooding out of Syria at the rate they are. And, I think it's important too that the United States make it very clear to Putin that it's not acceptable for him to be in Syria creating more chaos, bombing people on behalf of Assad, and we can't do that if we don't take more of a leadership position, which is what I'm advocating.” (October 2015, CNN Democratic Debate)

“One of the reasons why I worry about what’s happening in the Middle East right now is because of the breakout capacity of jihadist groups that can affect Europe, can affect the United States. Jihadist groups are governing territory. They will never stay there, though. They are driven to expand. Their raison d’etre is to be against the West, against the Crusaders, against the fill-in-the-blank — and we all fit into one of these categories. How do we try to contain that? I’m thinking a lot about containment, deterrence and defeat.” (August 2014, The Atlantic)

“Great nations need organizing principles, and ‘don’t do stupid stuff’ is not an organizing principle.” (August 2014, The Atlantic)

"I think that post the Arab revolutions that took place in Egypt and Libya and Tunisia, and elsewhere in the region, there was always going to be a period of adjustment. What we have to work for, along with the international community, is not to see these revolutions hijacked by extremists, not to see the return of dictatorial rule. It's hard going from decades under one party or one man rule, as somebody said, "waking up from a political coma and understanding democracy." (January 2013, Fox News)

U.S. Response to the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL)

"We have to smash ISIS's strongholds with an accelerated coalition air campaign, more support for Arab and Kurdish forces on the ground, and intense diplomatic efforts in Syria, Iraq and across the region." (September 19, 2016 - news conference)

"I am prepared to, ready to, actually take on those challenges. Not engage in a lot of irresponsible, reckless rhetoric. But to do the hard work, as I've done before. To put into place the strategies for local and state law enforcement, for an intelligence surge. For the kind of preventive actions that we need to take at home, and to intensify our efforts to fight ISIS." (September 19, 2016 - news conference)

"You don't hear a plan from him. He keeps saying he has a secret plan. Well the secret is, he has no plan." (September 19, 2016 - news conference)

“They are not going to get ground troops. We are not putting ground troops into Iraq ever again. And we’re not putting ground troops into Syria. We’re going to defeat ISIS without committing American ground troops. So those are the kinds of decisions we have to make on a case-by-case basis.” (September 7, 2016 – NBC Commander-In-Chief Forum)

“We also have to do a better job combating ISIS online, where they recruit, where they radicalize. And I don’t think we’re doing as much as we can. We need to work with Silicon Valley. We need to work with our experts in our government. We have got to disrupt, we have got to take them on in the arena of ideas that, unfortunately, pollute and capture the minds of vulnerable people. So we need to wage this war against ISIS from the air, on the ground, and online, in cyberspace.” (September 7, 2016 – NBC Commander-In-Chief Forum)

"American leadership means bringing the world together to solve global problems, as only we can. The United States built the international coalition against ISIS. Now we’re working with partners to take back territory and defeat them without getting drawn in to a ground war." (August 31, 2016 – American Legion National Convention speech)

"I know that we can’t cozy up to dictators. We have to stand up to them. We can’t contain ISIS, we must defeat them, and we will. We will do whatever is necessary for as long as it takes to bring them to justice, and end their reign of terror once and for all." (August 31, 2016 – American Legion National Convention speech)

"Now that we are past the semantic debate, Donald’s going to have to come up with something better. He’s got one other idea. He wants to ban all Muslims from entering our country, and now he wants to go even further and suspend all immigration from large parts of the world. Now, I’ve talked before about how this approach is un-American. It goes against everything we stand for as a country founded on religious freedom. But it is also dangerous. First, we rely on partners in Muslim countries to fight terrorists. This would make it harder. Second, we need to build trust in Muslim communities here at home to counter radicalization, and this would make it harder. Third, Trump’s words will be, in fact, they already are, a recruiting tool for ISIS to help them increase its ranks of people willing to do what we saw in Orlando. And fourth, he’s turning Americans against Americans, which is exactly what ISIS wants. Leaders who have actually fought terrorists know this. General Petraeus said recently that demonizing a religious faith and its adherents will come at a great cost. Not just to our values, but to our men and women in uniform and our national security. Commissioner Bill Bratton of the New York Police Department said this kinds of talk makes his job harder. He has Muslims in his police force, he has Muslims in the community. He needs everybody working together against any potential threat." (June 14, 2016 - Rally in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania)

"That’s why I have proposed an intelligence surge to bolster our capabilities across the board with appropriate safeguards here at home. Even as we make sure our security officials get the tools they need to prevent attacks, it’s essential that we stop terrorists from getting the tools they need to carry out the attack." (June 13, 2016 - Rally in Cleveland, OH)

“This act of terror is the largest mass shooting in American history and a tragedy that requires a serious response. . . . Donald Trump put out political attacks, weak platitudes and self-congratulations. Trump has offered no real plans to keep our nation safe and no outreach to the Americans targeted, just insults and attacks.” (June 13, 2016 - Statement to the Washington Post)

"For now, we can say for certain that we need to redouble our efforts to defend our country from threats at home and abroad. That means defeating international terror groups, working with allies and partners to go after them wherever they are, countering their attempts to recruit people here and everywhere, and hardening our defenses at home." (June 12, 2016 - Facebook)

"I am not going to demonize and demagogue and declare war on an entire religion, that's just plain dangerous and it plays into ISIS's hand. I think Trump, as usual, is obsessed with name calling. From my perspective, it matters what we do, not what we say. It matters that we got bin Laden, not what name we called him, but if he is somehow suggesting, I don't call this for what it is, he hasn't been listening.” (June 13, 2016 – Today Show)

"To me, radical jihadism, radical Islamism, I think they mean the same thing. I'm happy to say either, but that's not the point. All this talk and demagoguery and rhetoric is not going to solve the problem." (June 13, 2016 – Today Show)

“So it really matters that Donald Trump says things that go against our deepest-held values. It matters when he says he’ll order our military to murder the families of suspected terrorists. During the raid to kill bin Laden, when every second counted, our SEALs took the time to move the women and children in the compound to safety. Donald Trump may not get it, but that’s what honor looks like." (June 2, 2016 - Rally in San Diego, CA) 

“He [Trump] has said that he would order our military to carry out torture and the murder of civilians who are related to suspected terrorists – even though those are war crimes.” (June 2, 2016 - Rally in San Diego, CA)

“Defeating global terrorist networks and protecting the homeland takes more than empty talk and a handful of slogans. It takes a real plan, real experience and real leadership.” (June 2, 2016 - Rally in San Diego, CA)

"We need a real plan for confronting terrorists. As we saw six months ago in San Bernardino, the threat is real and urgent. Over the past year, I’ve laid out my plans for defeating ISIS. We need to take out their strongholds in Iraq and Syria by intensifying the air campaign and stepping up our support for Arab and Kurdish forces on the ground. We need to keep pursuing diplomacy to end Syria’s civil war and close Iraq’s sectarian divide, because those conflicts are keeping ISIS alive. We need to lash up with our allies, and ensure our intelligence services are working hand-in-hand to dismantle the global network that supplies money, arms, propaganda and fighters to the terrorists. We need to win the battle in cyberspace.” (June 2, 2016 - Rally in San Diego, CA)

“Defeating global terrorist networks and protecting the homeland takes more than empty talk and a handful of slogans. It takes a real plan, real experience and real leadership.” (June 2, 2016 - Rally in San Diego, CA)

“We have been effective in beginning to kill off the leadership of ISIS, to go after their funding sources, to make it very clear that we're going to keep training the Iraqi army. They've taken back Ramadi; we're going to be supporting them to take back every other part of the territory, most importantly Mosul, that ISIS has seized. So we are making progress.” (May 19, 2016 - CNN Interview)

“We're going to defeat them on the ground using our air power, equipping and training and supporting Arab and Kurdish fighters. We're going to drive them out of Iraq, drive them out of their stronghold in Raqqa, Syria.” (May 19, 2016 - CNN Interview)

"It would be a serious mistake to begin carpet bombing populated areas into oblivion. Proposing that doesn’t make you sound tough, it makes you sound like you are in over your head." (March 23, 2016 - Stanford speech)

"It would be wrong to  close our doors to orphans or to apply religious test to people fleeing religious persecution. That’s not who we are... It would be doubly cruel if ISIS can force families from our homes, but also prevent them from ever finding new ones." (March 23, 2016 - Stanford speech)

"Demonizing Muslims also alienates partners and undermines moderates around the world in the fight against ISIS." (March 23, 2016 - Stanford speech)

"We have to lead a coalition that will take back territory from ISIS. That is principally an American-led air campaign that we are now engaged in. We have to support the fighters on the ground, principally the Arabs and the Kurds who are willing to stand up and take territory back from Raqqa to Ramadi. We have to continue to work with the Iraqi army so that they are better prepared to advance on some of the other strongholds inside Iraq, like Mosul, when they are able to do so. And we have to cut off the flow of foreign funding and foreign fighters." (February 11, 2016 - Wisconsin Democratic Debate)

“I have a three-point plan that does not include American ground forces. It includes the United States leading an air coalition, which is what we are doing. Supporting fighters on the ground, the Iraqi Army, which is beginning to show more ability, the Sunni fighters– that we are now helping to reconstitute, and Kurdish fighters on both sides of the border...I think we also have to try to disrupt their supply chain of foreign fighters and foreign money. And we do have to contest them in online space. So I’m very committed to both going after ISIS, but also supporting what Secretary Kerry is doing to try to move on a political, diplomatic course to try to begin to slow down and hopefully end the carnage in Syria, which is the root of so many of the problems that we see in the region and beyond.” (January 17, 2016 - 4th Democratic Debate)

“If there is any blame to be spread around, it starts with the prime minister of Iraq, who sectarianized his military, se– setting Shia against Sunni. It is amplified by Assad, who has waged one of the bloodiest, most terrible attacks on his own people, 250,000 plus dead, millions fleeing, causing this vacuum that has been filled, unfortunately, by terrorist groups– including ISIS...So I think we are in the midst of great turmoil in this region. We have a proxy conflict going on between Saudi Arabia and Iran.”

"And then, most importantly, here at home, I think there are three things that we have to get right. We have to do the best possible job of sharing intelligence and information. That now includes the internet, because we have seen that ISIS is a very effective recruiter, propagandist and inciter and celebrator of violence. That means we have to work more closely with our great tech companies. They can't see the government as an adversary, we can't see them as obstructionists. We've got to figure out how we can do more to understand who is saying what and what they're planning. And we must work more closely with Muslim-American communities. Just like Martin, I met with a group of Muslim-Americans this past week to hear from them about what they're doing to try to stop radicalization. They will be our early warning signal. That's why we need to work with them, not demonize them, as the Republicans have been doing." (December 19, 2015 - ABC News Debate)

"Because I do believe that we have a history and a tradition, that is part of our values system and we don't want to sacrifice our values. We don't want to make it seem as though we are turning into a nation of fear instead of a nation of resolve. So I want us to have a very tough screening process but I want that process to go forward. And if at the end of 18 months, 24 months there are people who have been cleared, and I would prioritize widows, and orphans, and the elderly, people who may have relatives, families, or have nowhere else to go. I would prioritize them. And that would I think give the American public a bit more of a sense of security about who is being processed and who might end up coming as refugees." (December 19, 2015 - ABC News Debate

"I’ve proposed an “intelligence surge” against ISIS that includes more operations officers and linguists, enhancing our technical surveillance of overseas targets, intercepting terrorist communications, flying more reconnaissance missions to track terrorists’ movements, and developing even closer partnerships with other intelligence services." (December 2015, University of Minnesota speech)

"Except for limited exceptions like diplomats and aid workers, anyone who has traveled in the past five years to a country facing serious problems with terrorism and foreign fighters should have to go through a full visa investigation, no matter where they’re from." (December 2015, University of Minnesota speech)

"As I’ve said before, the United States has to take a close look at our visa programs.  And I am glad the administration and Congress are stepping up scrutiny in the wake of San Bernardino.  And that should include scrutinizing applicants’ social media postings.  We also should dispatch more Homeland Security agents to high-risk countries to better investigate visa applicants." (December 2015, University of Minnesota speech)

"One, defeat ISIS in the Middle East by smashing its stronghold, hitting its fighters, leaders, and infrastructure from the air, and intensifying support for local forces who can pursue them on the ground. Second, defeat them around the world by dismantling the global network of terror that supplies radical jihadists with money, arms, propaganda, and fighters. And third, defeat them here at home by foiling plots, disrupting radicalization, and hardening our defenses. Now, these three lines of effort reinforce one another.  So we need to pursue all of them at once, using every pillar of American power." (December 2015, University of Minnesota speech)

"So the task of bringing Sunnis off the sidelines into this new fight will be considerably more difficult. But nonetheless, we need to lay the foundation for a second “Sunni awakening.” We need to put sustained pressure on the government in Baghdad to gets its political house in order, move forward with national reconciliation, and finally, stand up a national guard. Baghdad needs to accept, even embrace, arming Sunni and Kurdish forces in the war against ISIS. But if Baghdad won’t do that, the coalition should do so directly." (November 2015, Council on Foreign Relations)

"The obsession in some quarters with a clash of civilizations or repeating the specific words ‘radical Islamic terrorism’ isn’t just a distraction. It gives these criminals, these murderers, more standing than they deserve. It actually plays into their hands by alienating partners we need by our side.” (November 2015, Council on Foreign Relations)

 "We have to look at ISIS as the leading threat of an international terror network. It cannot be contained, it must be defeated...But this cannot be an American fight, although American leadership is essential." (November 2015, CBS Democratic Debate)

"Well, our prayers are with the people of France tonight. But that is not enough. We need to have a resolve that will bring the world together to root out the kind of radical jihadist ideology that motivates organizations like ISIS, the barbaric, ruthless, violence jihadist, terrorist group." (November 2015, CBS Democratic Debate)

“I don't think we're at war with Islam. I don't think we at war with all Muslims. I think we're at war with jihadists… you can talk about Islamists who-- clearly are also jihadists.” (November 2015, CBS Democratic Debate)

“I don't think that the United States-- has the bulk of the responsibility [to deal with ISIL]. I really put that on Assad and on the Iraqis and on the region itself.” (November 2015, CBS Democratic Debate)

“I think that-- we have to look at ISIS as the leading threat of an international terror network. It cannot be contained, it must be defeated. There is no question in my mind that if we summon our resources, both our leadership resources and all of the tools at our disposal, not just military force which should be used as a last resort, but our diplomacy, our development aid, law enforcement, sharing of intelligence in a much more-- open and cooperative way-- that we can bring people together. But it cannot be an American fight. And I think what the president has consistently said-- which I agree with-- is that we will support those who take the fight to ISIS.” (November 2015, CBS Democratic Debate)

“We’ve got to figure out how to, if possible, have a second Arab awakening in Anbar province, get the Sunni tribes to feel that it is their fight again, as they once did. And that requires a lot of political pressure being put on Baghdad. Injecting some large contingent of American forces complicates that, in my opinion. Right now, we need to keep the pressure on the people on the ground, and get them to change their priorities, and work together.” (November 2015, Council on Foreign Relations)

“We are already flying in Syria just as we are flying in Iraq. The president has made a very tough decision. What I believe and why I have advocated that the no-fly zone -- which of course would be in a coalition -- be put on the table is because I'm trying to figure out what leverage we have to get Russia to the table.” (October 2015, CNN Democratic Debate)

“We don't want American troops on the ground in Syria. I never said that. What I said was we had to put together a coalition -- in fact, something that I worked on before I left the State Department -- to do, and yes, that it should include Arabs, people in the region.” (October 2015, CNN Democratic Debate)

"I think it's a very difficult situation and I basically agree with the policies that we are currently following, and that is, American air support is available. American intelligence and surveillance is available. There is no role whatsoever for American soldiers on the ground to go back, other than in the capacity as trainers and advisers." (May 2015, Daily Mail)

“I do not believe that US troops should be on the ground in Iraq doing combat…I have supported the President’s approach to dealing with this very serious threat.” (June 2015, Radio Iowa)

"There has to be more [than a military response].You have to combat them on social media, you have to do more to enlist Arab support ... to demonstrate this is not some sort of an American/Western effort and it involves significant Arab participation."(October 2014, CNN)

“This is the best funded, most professional, expansionist Jihadist military force that we have seen ever.” (October 2014, Wall Street Journal)

"Whether you call them ISIS or ISIL, I refuse to call them the Islamic State, because they are neither Islamic or a state. Whatever you call them, I think we can agree that the threat is real.” (October 2014, CNN)

Syria

“They are not going to get ground troops. We are not putting ground troops into Iraq ever again. And we’re not putting ground troops into Syria. We’re going to defeat ISIS without committing American ground troops. So those are the kinds of decisions we have to make on a case-by-case basis.” (September 7, 2016 – NBC Commander-In-Chief Forum)

"Yes, when I was secretary of state I did urge, along with the Department of Defense and the CIA that we seek out, vet, and train, and arm Syrian opposition figures so that they could defend themselves against Assad. The president said no. Now, that's how it works. People who work for the president make recommendations and then the president makes the decision. So I think it's only fair to look at where we are in Syria today. And, yes, I do still support a no-fly zone because I think we need to put in safe havens for those poor Syrians who are fleeing both Assad and ISIS and have some place that they can be safe." (April 14, 2016 - CNN Democratic Debate in Brooklyn)

"This is one of the areas I've disagreed with Senator Sanders on, who has called for Iranian troops trying to end civil war in Syria, which I think would be a grave mistake. Putting Iranian troops right on the border of the Golan right next to Israel would be a nonstarter for me. Trying to get Iran and Saudi Arabia to work together, as he has suggested in the past, is equally a nonstarter." (February 11, 2016 - Wisconsin Democratic Debate)

"The agreement on a cease-fire, though, is something that has to be implemented more quickly than the schedule that the Russians agreed to. You know, the Russians wanted to buy time. Are they buying time to continue their bombardment on behalf of the Assad regime to further decimate what's left of the opposition, which would be a grave disservice to any kind of eventual cease-fire? So I know Secretary Kerry is working extremely hard to try to move that cease-fire up as quickly as possible." (February 11, 2016 - Wisconsin Democratic Debate)

"So as we get a cease-fire and maybe some humanitarian corridors, that still leaves the terrorist groups on the doorstep of others in Syria, Turkey, Lebanon, Jordan, and the like. So we've got some real work to do, and let's try to make sure we actually implement what has been agreed to with the Russians." (February 11, 2016 - Wisconsin Democratic Debate)

"With respect to the United States, I think our role in NATO, our support for the E.U., as well as our willingness to take refugees so long as they are thoroughly vetted and that we have confidence from intelligence and other sources that they can come to our country, we should be doing our part. And we should back up the recent donors conference to make sure we have made our contribution to try to deal with the enormous cost that these refugees are posing to Turkey and to members of the E.U. in particular." (February 11, 2016 - Wisconsin Democratic Debate)

We were able to get the chemical weapons out. I know from my own experience– as secretary of State– that we were deeply worried about Assad’s forces using chemical weapons, because it would have had not only an horrific effect on people in Syria, but it could very well have affected the surrounding states– Jordan, Israel, Lebanon, Turkey. So getting those chemical weapons out was a big–” (January 17, 2016 - Washington Post)

"I am advocating the no-fly zone both because I think it would help us on the ground to protect Syrians; I'm also advocating it because I think it gives us some leverage in our conversations with Russia." (December 19, 2015 - ABC News Debate

"I think it's fair to say, Assad has killed, by last count, about 250,000 Syrians. The reason we are in the mess we're in, that ISIS has the territory it has, is because of Assad. I advocated arming the moderate opposition back in the day when I was still secretary of State, because I worried we would end up exactly where we are now. And so, when we look at these complex problems, I wish it could be either/or. I wish we could say yes, let's go destroy ISIS and let's let Assad continue to destroy Syria, which creates more terrorists, more extremists by the minute. No. We now finally are where we need to be. We have a strategy and a commitment to go after ISIS, which is a danger to us as well as the region." (December 19, 2015 - ABC News Debate

"And now you know with this new refugee crisis of course we have to have a lot of vigilance and we have to vet people and I would depend upon our defense and intelligence professionals to guide us in doing that. But we can't act as though we’re shutting the doors to people in need without undermining who we are as Americans and the values we have stood for.” (November 2015, Campaign Rally in Texas)

"We've seen a lot of hateful rhetoric from the GOP. But the idea that we'd turn away refugees because of religion is a new low." (November 17, 2015 - Twitter)

“We should take-- increased numbers of refugees. The administration originally said ten. I said we should go to 65 but only if we have as carefully screening and vetting process as we can imagine whatever resources it takes. Because I do not want us to-- in any way-- inadvertently allow people who wish us harm to come into our country.” (November 2015, CBS Democratic Debate)

“Well, that’s a hypothetical that I think there are many steps you have to go through and decisions you have to make before you even get to that.  NATO did have to warn the Russians because they were invading Turkish air space…a NATO ally, they were escorted out.  Part of the reason I have proposed a no-fly zone as a coalition effort, not a United States solo effort, is to have conversations with the Russians at the table.  Because the goal of any no-fly zone is not only to provide safe areas for Syrians so they don’t have to be fleeing or continued to be bombed by Assad, supported now by the Russians, but to give some leverage to get everybody at the table, to try to create as much as a cease-fire, including the Assad forces, with the Russians and the Iranians as well.  One of the ways that you do that diplomatically is you put out some ideas like what – we’re going to talk about a no-fly zone and, in fact, I thought it was interesting, you know, on the other side of the argument here, Putin is now saying, OK, now we can talk diplomatically because we’re changing the situation on the ground, and therefore we should come and have some diplomatic consultations.  I think the no-fly zone, which the Turks have asked for for a long time and humanitarian organizations have, is a device as well as a potential outcome to see how we get people to the table.  And the Russians would be certainly warned.  There’s been military discussions now to, as I say, de-conflict air space.  So I think it would be highly unlikely, if this were done in the right way…” (October 2015, Rachel Maddow Show)

"I do believe we should be putting together a coalition to support a no-fly zone. It’s complicated, and the Russians would have to be part of it, or it wouldn’t work. But we have to make a strong case for it.” (October 2015, Campaign Event)

“We have a long and proud tradition of accepting refugees from conflict.” (October 2015, Boston WHDH Interview)

“We’re facing the worst refugee crisis since the end of World War II. I think the United States has to do more, and I’d like to see us move from what is a good start with 10,000 to 65,000 [refugees].” (September 2015, CBS interview

"I think that the larger Middle East, I think Asia – I think everybody should step up and say we have to help these people. And I would hope that under the aegis of the United Nations, led by the security council, and certainly by the United States, which has been such a generous nation in the past ... we would begin to try to find ways to help people get to safety in other lands. However, that does not solve the problem, and the problem is one that, the entire world now sees, doesn’t just affect the Syrian people – it affects all of us." (September 2015, MSNBC interview)

“The failure to help build up a credible fighting force of the people who were the originators of the protests against Assad—there were Islamists, there were secularists, there was everything in the middle—the failure to do that left a big vacuum, which the jihadists have now filled.” (August 2014, The Atlantic)

“It is impossible to watch the suffering in Syria, including as a private citizen, and not ask what more could have been done…. Wicked problems can’t paralyze us. We need to urgently seek solutions, however hard they are to find.” (2014, Hard Choices)

Israel/Palestine

“Well, I think there are number of issues that we should be addressing. I have put forth a plan to defeat ISIS. It does involve going after them online. I think we need to do much more with our tech companies to prevent ISIS and their operatives from being able to use the Internet to radicalize, even direct, people in our country, in Europe, and elsewhere. But we also have to intensify our airstrikes against ISIS and eventually support our Arab and Kurdish partners to be able to actually take out ISIS in Rocca and in their claim of being a caliphate. We’re making progress. Our military is assisting in Iraq, and we’re hoping that within the year, will be able to push ISIS out of Iraq, and then, you know, really squeeze them in Syria. But we have to be cognizant of the fact that they've had foreign fighters coming to volunteer for them, foreign money, foreign weapons. So we have to make this the top priority, and I would also do everything possible to take out their leadership. I was involved in a number of efforts to take out Al Qaeda leadership when I was secretary of state, including of course, taking out bin Laden. And I think we need to go after Baghdadi as well, make that one of our organizing principles because we’ve got to defeat ISIS. And we’ve got to do everything we can to disrupt their propaganda efforts online.” (September 26, 2016 – 1st Presidential Debate)

“Only a two-state solution can provide Palestinians independence, sovereignty and dignity, and provide Israelis the secure and recognized borders of a democratic, Jewish state...Now, it’s no secret that the most recent efforts to advance direct negotiations didn’t yield much tangible progress. But I remain convinced, and I think it’s important we all remain convinced, that peace is possible. Inaction is not an option... Israelis deserve security, recognition, and a normal life free from terror. And Palestinians too deserve a normal life and should be able to govern themselves in their own state, in peace and dignity. Now for most Americans, it is hard to imagine the reality that exists for many Palestinians and recently for Israelis. So as difficult as this is, we need to look for opportunities to move forward together." (Sept 15, 2016 - Clinton email to Arab American News)

"Everyone has to do their part to create the conditions for progress by taking positive actions that can rebuild trust and by avoiding damaging actions, including with respect to settlements,"

“That’s why it is no small thing when he [Trump] talks about leaving NATO, or says he’ll stay neutral on Israel’s security." (June 2, 2016 - Rally in San Diego, CA)

"It is because of my longstanding commitment to the Israeli people and to the security ofIsrael that I am writing to express my opposition to the Boycott, Divestment, and Sanction movement, or 'BDS,' the  global effort to isolate the State of Israel by ending commercial and academic exchanges. I know you agree that we need to make countering BDS a priority, and that we need to work together across party lines and with a diverse array of voices to reverse this trend with information and advocacy, and fight back against further attempts to isolate and delegitimize Israel. It would be a serious mistake for the United States to abandon our responsibilities, or cede the mantle of leadership for global peace and security to anyone else. The Jewish state is a modern day miracle a vibrant bloom in the middle of a desert and we must nurture and protect it. I believe that BDS seeks to punish Israel and dictate how the Israelis and Palestinians should resolve the core issues of their conflict. This is not the path to peace. I remain convinced that Israel’s long-term security and future as a Jewish state depends on having two states for two peoples. But that can only be achieved through direct negotiations between Israelis and Palestinians; it cannot be imposed from the outside or by unilateral actions. As Secretary of State, I convened the last round of direct talks between Israeli and Palestinian leaders; I knowhow hard this will be, but it is an effort to which I would be committed as president.Israel is a vibrant democracy in a region dominated by autocracy, and it faces existential threats to its survival. Fighting for Israel isn’t just about policy; it is a personal commitment to the friendship between our peoples and our vision for peace and security. Particularly at a time when anti-Semitism is on the rise across the world, we need to repudiate forceful efforts to malign and undermine Israel and the Jewish people. Anti-Semitism has no place in any civilized society not in America, not in Europe, not anywhere. We must never tire in defending Israel’s legitimacy, expanding security and economic ties,  and taking our alliance to the next level.Please know that I am grateful for your work, and that I stand ready to be your partner as we engage all people of good faith regardless of their political persuasion or their views on policy specifics in explaining why the BDS campaign is counterproductive to the pursuit of peace and harmful to Israelis and Palestinians alike." (May 8, 2016 - Letter to the Israel Action Network and the Jewish Federations of North America)

"I negotiated the cease-fire between Israel and Hamas in November of 2012. I did it in concert with President Abbas of the Palestinian authority based in Ramallah, I did it with the then Muslim Brotherhood President, Morsi, based in Cairo, working closely with Prime Minister Netanyahu and the Israeli cabinet. I can tell you right now I have been there with Israeli officials going back more than 25 years that they do not seek this kind of attacks. They do not invite the rockets raining down on their towns and villages. They do not believe that there should be a constant incitement by Hamas aided and abetted by Iran against Israel. And, so when it came time after they had taken the incoming rockets, taken the assaults and ambushes on their soldiers and they called and told me, I was in Cambodia, that they were getting ready to have to invade Gaza again because they couldn't find anybody to talk to tell them to stop it, I flew all night, I got there, I negotiated that. So, I don't know how you run a country when you are under constant threat, terrorist tact, rockets coming at you. You have a right to defend yourself. That does not mean -- that does not mean that you don't take appropriate precautions. And, I understand that there's always second guessing anytime there is a war. It also does not mean that we should not continue to do everything we can to try to reach a two-state solution, which would give the Palestinians the rights and... just let me finish. The rights and the autonomy that they deserve. And, let me say this, if Yasser Arafat had agreed with my husband at Camp David in the Late 1990s to the offer then Prime Minister Barat put on the table, we would have had a Palestinian state for 15 years." (April 14, 2016 - CNN Democratic Debate in Brooklyn)

"I think I did answer it by saying that of course there have to be precautions taken but even the most independent analyst will say the way that Hamas places its weapons, the way that it often has its fighters in civilian garb, it is terrible. I'm not saying it's anything other than terrible. It would be great -- remember, Israel left Gaza. They took out all the Israelis. They turned the keys over to the Palestinian people. And what happened? Hamas took over Gaza. So instead of having a thriving economy with the kind of opportunities that the children of the Palestinians deserve, we have a terrorist haven that is getting more and more rockets shipped in from Iran and elsewhere." (April 14, 2016 - CNN Democratic Debate in Brooklyn)

"Well, if I -- I want to add, you know, again describing the problem is a lot easier than trying to solve it. And I have been involved, both as first lady with my husband's efforts, as a senator supporting the efforts that even the Bush administration was undertaking, and as secretary of state for President Obama, I'm the person who held the last three meetings between the president of the Palestinian Authority and the prime minister of Israel. There were only four of us in the room, Netanyahu, Abbas, George Mitchell, and me. Three long meetings. And I was absolutely focused on what was fair and right for the Palestinians. I was absolutely focused on what we needed to do to make sure that the Palestinian people had the right to self-government. And I believe that as president I will be able to continue to make progress and get an agreement that will be fair both to the Israelis and the Palestinians without ever, ever undermining Israel's security." (April 14, 2016 - CNN Democratic Debate in Brooklyn)

“[When] your soldiers are under attack, you have to respond. Hamas provokes Israel. They often pretend to have people in civilian garb acting as though they are civilians who are Hamas fighters. It’s a very different undertaking for Israel to target those who are targeting them. And I think Israel has had to defend itself, has a right to defend itself.” (April 9, 2016 - CNN's State of the Union)

"Despite many setbacks, I remain convinced that peace with security is possible and that it is the only way to guarantee Israel’s long-term survival as a strong Jewish and democratic state. It may be difficult to imagine progress in this current climate when many Israelis doubt that a willing and capable partner for peace even exists. But inaction cannot be an option. Israelis deserve a secure homeland for the Jewish people. Palestinians should be able to govern themselves in their own state, in peace and dignity. And only a negotiated two-state agreement can survive those outcomes." (March 21, 2016 - AIPAC conference speech)

"All of us need to look for opportunities to create the conditions for progress, including by taking positive actions that can rebuild trust — like the recent constructive meetings between the Israeli and Palestinian finance ministers aiming to help bolster the Palestinian economy, or the daily on-the-ground security cooperation between Israel and the Palestinian Authority." (March 21, 2016 - AIPAC conference speech)

"Everyone has to do their part by avoiding damaging actions, including with respect to settlements. Now, America has an important role to play in supporting peace efforts. And as president, I would continue the pursuit of direct negotiations. And let me be clear — I would vigorously oppose any attempt by outside parties to impose a solution, including by the U.N. Security Council." (March 21, 2016 - AIPAC conference speech)

"Yes, we need steady hands, not a president who says he’s neutral on Monday, pro-Israel on Tuesday, and who knows what on Wednesday, because everything’s negotiable. Well, my friends, Israel’s security is non-negotiable....We can’t be neutral when rockets rain down on residential neighborhoods, when civilians are stabbed in the street, when suicide bombers target the innocent. Some things aren’t negotiable. And anyone who doesn’t understand that has no business being our president."  (March 21, 2016 - AIPAC conference speech)

"Many of the young people here today are on the front lines of the battle to oppose the alarming boycott, divestment and sanctions movement known as BDS. Particularly at a time when anti-Semitism is on the rise across the world, especially in Europe, we must repudiate all efforts to malign, isolate and undermine Israel and the Jewish people. I’ve been sounding the alarm for a while now. As I wrote last year in a letter to the heads of major American Jewish organizations, we have to be united in fighting back against BDS. Many of its proponents have demonized Israeli scientists and intellectuals, even students." (March 21, 2016 - AIPAC conference speech)

"One of the first things I’ll do in office is invite the Israeli prime minister to visit the White House." (March 21, 2016 - AIPAC conference speech)

"As we have differences, as any friends do, we will work to resolve them quickly and respectfully. We will also be clear that the United States has an enduring interest in and commitment to a more peaceful, more stable, more secure Middle East. And we will step up our efforts to achieve that outcome." (March 21, 2016 - AIPAC conference speech)

"Palestinian leaders need to stop inciting violence, stop celebrating terrorists as martyrs and stop paying rewards to their families." (March 21, 2016 - AIPAC conference speech)

"First of all, Israel is our partner, our ally. We have longstanding and important ties with Israelis going back to the formation of the state of Israel. I will defend and do everything I can to support Israel, particularly as the neighborhood around it becomes more dangerous and difficult. I also believe the Palestinians deserve to have a state of their own. Thats why I support a two state solution, thats what I've worked on. That's what I tried to move forward while I was Secretary. Holding three very intense conversation between the Prime Minister of Israel and the President of the Palestinian Authority. Those are not mutually exclusive. I happen to think the two state solution, trying to provide support for the aspirations of the Palestinians people is in the long term interests of Israel as well as the region, and of course the people themselves." (February 21, 2016, CNN State of the Union

"The alliance between our two nations transcends politics. It is and should always be a commitment that unites us, not a wedge that divides us." (November 2015, Forward)

"My first visit to Israel, in December 1981, sparked an enduring emotional connection for me — to the land and its people — and admiration for how Israelis have built a thriving democracy in a region full of adversaries and autocrats." (November 2015, Forward)

"This violence must not be allowed to continue. It needs to stop immediately, and Israelis and Palestinians must move back toward the path of peaceful reconciliation. All parties and the international community should condemn any political and religious leader who stokes tensions with irresponsible rhetoric." (November 2015, Forward)

"I am deeply committed to Israel’s future as a secure and democratic Jewish state, and just as convinced that the only way to guarantee that outcome is through diplomacy. And while no solution can be imposed from outside, I believe the United States has a responsibility to help bring Israelis and Palestinians to the table and to encourage the difficult but necessary decisions that will lead to peace. As president I will never stop working to advance the goal of two states for two peoples living in peace, security and dignity." (November 2015, Forward)

"I will do everything I can to enhance our strategic partnership and strengthen America’s security commitment to Israel, ensuring that it always has the qualitative military edge to defend itself. That includes immediately dispatching a delegation of the Joint Chiefs of Staff to meet with senior Israeli commanders. I would also invite the Israeli prime minister to the White House in my first month in office." (November 2015, Forward)

"I also will combat growing efforts to isolate Israel internationally and to undermine its future as a Jewish state, including the Boycott, Divestment and Sanctions movement. I’ve spoken out against BDS in the United States and at the U.N., and will continue to do so." (November 2015, Forward)

"For me, fighting for Israel isn’t just about policy — it’s a personal commitment to the friendship between our peoples and our vision for peace and security." (November 2015, Forward)

“I am alarmed by the recent wave of attacks against Israelis, including more than a dozen separate attacks since last Saturday. My thoughts and prayers are with the victims and their families. Men and women living in Jerusalem, Tel Aviv, and elsewhere cannot carry groceries or travel to prayer without looking over their shoulder. It is wrong, and it must stop. There's no place for violence--only dialogue can produce a lasting peace.” (October 2015, campaign statement)

"Well, I think there is a lot of room for tough love, particularly in private and behind, you know, closed doors. As I write in my book, you know, certainly Prime Minister Netanyahu and I have had very vigorous conversations that have gone on in person and over the phone. But I just don’t think it’s a particularly productive approach for the United States to take because, in large measure, it opens the door to everybody else to delegitimize Israel, to, you know, pile on in ways that are not good for the strength and stability, not just of Israel obviously, but of the region. And so in the absence of, you know, some kind of greater goal that we were trying to achieve by doing that, I just don’t think that is the smartest approach." (September 2015, Brookings Institute)

"I wouldn't support his agreement for one second if I thought it put Israel in greater danger. I know well that the same forces that threaten Israel, threaten the United States. To the people of Israel, you will never have to question whether we are with you. The United States will always be with you." (September 2015, Brookings Institute)

“BDS seeks to punish Israel and dictate how the Israelis and Palestinians should resolve the core issues of their conflict. This is not the path to peace.” (July 2015, Letter to Haim Saban)

Regarding her record as Secretary of State and U.S. Senator, Clinton said she “opposed dozens of anti-Israel resolutions at the UN…and other international organizations. Time after time I have made it clear that America will always stand up for Israel — and that’s what I’ll always do as President,” (July 2015, Politico

“I think Israel did what it had to do to respond to the rockets. Israel has a right to defend itself. The steps Hamas has taken to embed rockets and command-and-control facilities and tunnel entrances in civilian areas, this makes a response by Israel difficult.” (August 2014, The Atlantic)

“If I were the prime minister of Israel, you’re damn right I would expect to have control over security, because even if I’m dealing with [Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud] Abbas, who is 79 years old, and other members of Fatah, who are enjoying a better lifestyle and making money on all kinds of things, that does not protect Israel from the influx of Hamas or cross-border attacks from anywhere else.” (August 2014, The Atlantic)

"What you see on TV is so effectively stage-managed by Hamas, and always has been. What you see is largely what Hamas invites and permits Western journalists to report on from Gaza. It’s the old PR problem that Israel has. Yes, there are substantive, deep levels of antagonism or anti-Semitism towards Israel, because it’s a powerful state, a really effective military. And Hamas paints itself as the defender of the rights of the Palestinians to have their own state. So the PR battle is one that is historically tilted against Israel." (August 2014, The Atlantic)

“When we left the city and visited Jericho, in the West Bank, I got my first glimpse of life under occupation for Palestinians, who were denied the dignity and self-determination that Americans take for granted.” (2014, Hard Choices)

Lebanon

No statements recorded. If you'd like to submit a statement to appear on this website, please email Kristin McCarthy.

Iran Nuclear Deal 

“I spent a year and a half putting together a coalition that included Russia and China to impose the toughest sanctions on Iran. And we did drive them to the negotiating table. And my successor John Kerry and President Obama got a deal that put a lid on Iran's nuclear program. Without firing a single shot. That’s diplomacy. That’s coalition-building.” (September 26, 2016 – 1st Presidential Debate)

“It's also important that we look at the entire global situation. There’s no doubt that we have other problems with Iran but personally I'd rather deal with the other problems having put that lid on their nuclear program than still to be facing that.” (September 26, 2016 – 1st Presidential Debate)

“And Donald never tells you what he would do. What he have started a war? Would he have bombed Iran? If he's going to criticize a deal that has been very successful in giving us access to Iranian facilities that we never had before, then he should tell us what his alternative would be.” (September 26, 2016 – 1st Presidential Debate)

“When I became secretary of state, the Iranians were on a fast track to acquiring the material necessary to get a nuclear weapon. That had happened the prior eight years. They mastered the nuclear fuel cycle, they built covert facilities, they stocked them with centrifuges, and they were moving forward. What was our decision? Our decision was to try to put together an international coalition that included Russia and China to exert the kind of pressure through sanctions that the United States alone could not do… So, yes, I put together the coalition. We imposed the sanctions. We got them to the negotiating table. And after I left, we got the agreement. That agreement put a lid on their nuclear weapons program and imposed intrusive inspections. I have said we are going to enforce it to the letter…I think we have enough insight into what they’re doing to be able to say we have to distrust but verify. What I am focused on is all the other malicious activities of the Iranians — ballistic missiles, support for terrorists, being involved in Syria, Yemen, and other places, supporting Hezbollah, Hamas…. I would rather as president be dealing with Iran on all of those issues without having to worry as much about their racing for a nuclear weapon. So we have made the world safer; we just have to make sure it’s enforced.” (September 7, 2016 – NBC Commander-In-Chief Forum)

"We’ll make a renewed push to reduce the world’s nuclear weapons. Because that does make us all safer. And we’ll step up our efforts to secure nuclear material around the world and stop terrorists from acquiring or using weapons of mass destruction. One of the first things I will do as president, is to call for a new nuclear posture review. We have to make sure that America’s arsenal is prepared to meet future threats." (August 31, 2016 – American Legion National Convention speech)

“We must enforce that deal vigorously. And as I’ve said many times before, our approach must be “distrust and verify.” The world must understand that the United States will act decisively if necessary, including with military action, to stop Iran from getting a nuclear weapon. In particular, Israel’s security is non-negotiable. They’re our closest ally in the region, and we have a moral obligation to defend them.” (June 2, 2016 - Rally in San Diego, CA)

"At the same time, America should always stand with those voices inside Iran calling for more openness. Now look, we know the supreme leader still calls the shots and that the hard-liners are intent on keeping their grip on power. But the Iranian people themselves deserve a better future, and they are trying to make their voices heard. They should know that America is not their enemy, they should know we will support their efforts to bring positive change to Iran." (March 21, 2016 - AIPAC conference speech)

"For many years, we’ve all been rightly focused on the existential danger of Iran acquiring a nuclear weapon. After all, this remains an extremist regime that threatens to annihilate Israel. That’s why I led the diplomacy to impose crippling sanctions and force Iran to the negotiating table, and why I ultimately supported the agreement that has put a lid on its nuclear program. Today Iran’s enriched uranium is all but gone, thousands of centrifuges have stopped spinning, Iran’s potential breakout time has increased and new verification measures are in place to help us deter and detect any cheating. I really believe the United States, Israel and the world are safer as a result. But still, as I laid out at a speech at the Brookings Institution last year, it’s not good enough to trust and verify. Our approach must be distrust and verify. This deal must come with vigorous enforcement, strong monitoring, clear consequences for any violations and a broader strategy to confront Iran’s aggression across the region. We cannot forget that Tehran’s fingerprints are on nearly every conflict across the Middle East, from Syria to Lebanon to Yemen.The Iranian Revolutionary Guard Corps and its proxies are attempting to establish a position on the Golan from which to threaten Israel, and they continue to fund Palestinian terrorists. In Lebanon, Hezbollah is amassing an arsenal of increasingly sophisticated rockets and artillery that well may be able to hit every city in Israel. Tonight, you will hear a lot of rhetoric from the other candidates about Iran, but there’s a big difference between talking about holding Tehran accountable and actually doing it. Our next president has to be able to hold together our global coalition and impose real consequences for even the smallest violations of this agreement. We must maintain the legal and diplomatic architecture to turn all the sanctions back on if need. If I’m elected the leaders of Iran will have no doubt that if we see any indication that they are violating their commitment not to seek, develop or acquire nuclear weapons, the United States will act to stop it, and that we will do so with force if necessary. Iranian provocations, like the recent ballistic missile tests, are also unacceptable and should be answered firmly and quickly including with more sanctions.Those missiles were stamped with words declaring, and I quote, “Israel should be wiped from the pages of history.” We know they could reach Israel or hit the tens of thousands of American troops stationed in the Middle East. This is a serious danger and it demands a serious response." (March 21, 2016 - AIPAC conference speech)

"I think we have achieved a great deal with the Iranian nuclear agreement to put a lid on the Iranian nuclear weapons program. That has to be enforced absolutely with consequences for Iran at the slightest deviation from their requirements under the agreement. I do not think we should promise or even look toward normalizing relations because we have a lot of other business to get done with Iran. Yes, they have to stop being the main state sponsor of terrorism. Yes, they have to stop trying to destabilize the Middle East, causing even more chaos. Yes, they've got to get out of Syria. They've got to quit sponsoring Hezbollah and Hamas. They have got to quit trying to ship rockets into Gaza that can be used against Israel. We have a lot of work to do with Iran before we ever say that they could move toward normalized relations with us." (February 11, 2016 - Wisconsin Democratic Debate)

Well, I’m very proud– of the– Iran nuclear agreement. I was– very pleased to be part of– what the president put into action when he took office. I was responsibility for getting those sanctions imposed, which put the pressure on Iran that brought them to the negotiating table, which resulted in this agreement...And so they have been, so far, following their requirements under the agreement. But I think we still have to carefully watch them. We’ve had one good day over 36 years, and I think we need more good days before we move more rapidly– toward any know normalization. And we have to be sure that they are truly going to implement the agreements. And then we have to go after them on a lot of their other bad behavior in the region, which is causing enormous problems in Syria, Yemen, Iraq, and elsewhere. (January 17, 2016 - Washington Post)

"I don’t believe Iran is our partner in this agreement. Iran is the subject of the agreement... The U.S. will never allow you to acquire a nuclear weapon. I will not hesitate to take military action if Iran attempts to obtain a nuclear weapon... We should expect that Iran will want to test the next president. They will want to see how far they can bend the rules. That won’t work if I’m in the White House." (September 2015, Brookings Institute)

"Based on what I know now…this is an important step in putting a lid on Iran’s nuclear program. There will be a number of issues that will have to be addressed. This agreement will have to be enforced vigorously and relentlessly…we have to treat this as an ongoing enforcement effort which I strongly support and as president I would be absolutely devoted to ensuring that the agreement is followed. And secondly, this does put a lid on the nuclear program but we still have lot of concern about the bad behavior and the actions by Iran which remains the largest stat sponsor of terrorism and which poses an existential threat to Israel…that bad behavior is something we have to address." (July 2015, Politico)

“The odds of reaching that comprehensive agreement are not good. I am also personally skeptical that the Iranians would follow through and deliver. I have seen their behavior over the years. But this is a development that is worth testing.” (May 2014, Politico)

"The onus is on Iran and the bar must be set high. It can never be permitted to acquire a nuclear weapon … There is much to do and much more to say in the months ahead, but for now diplomacy deserves a chance to succeed." (April 2015, CNN)

"The understanding that the major world powers have reached with Iran is an important step toward a comprehensive agreement that would prevent Iran from getting a nuclear weapon and strengthen the security of the United States, Israel, and the region."(April 2015, Business Insider)

Voting Rights

There’s a lot we have to do on immigration reform, on voting rights, on campaign finance reform, but we need to do it together.”(January 17, 2016 - Washington Post)

“Congress should immediately pass legislation to restore the Voting Rights Act to ensure the full protections that American voters need and deserve.  And we all need to do our part to fight back against efforts across our country to disempower and disenfranchise young people, people of color, poor people, and people with disabilities. As President, I would work to adopt additional reforms to make it easier, not harder, for every citizen to vote." (August 2015, campaign statement)   

“Well, let me say that I believe in publicly financed elections, we’ve had a check box on the tax form for a long time, and most people don’t check it anymore. And with the Supreme Court opening the door to all this unaccountable, undisclosed money, it’s very difficult to get the changes we need. And then we’ve got a Federal Elections Commission that is paralyzed because Republicans won’t enforce the laws, even as we think that they should be. So I think we have to do several things. Most importantly, we have to reverse the effects, not just of Citizens United, but of the Buckley case, and I’m going to do everything I can to appoint Supreme Court justices who understand that, I’ll do everything I can to then go to a legal framework and, as I said, if necessary I will support a constitutional amendment, okay?” (August 2015, The Intercept)

Candidate Clinton introduced a voting rights plan in June 2015.

“Today Republicans are systematically and deliberately trying to stop millions of American citizens from voting. What part of democracy are they afraid of?” (June 2015, TSU)

“We’ve seen a sweeping effort across our country to construct new obstacles to voting, often undercover and addressing a phantom epidemic of election fraud … but preserving fairness and equality in our voting system is one that we can and that we should.” (August 2013, Washington Post)

“By trying to require not just photo identification but proof of citizenship — proof that thousands of American citizens can’t produce through no fault of their own — cynical Republican lawmakers are trying to build new walls between hundreds of thousands of eligible senior, minority, and low-income Americans and their civil right to choose their own leaders. Republicans claim that these requirements are needed to prevent fraud, but the reality is that they do little more than disenfranchise eligible voters.” (2005, U.S. Senate

Civil Rights and Civil Liberties

“Race remains a significant challenge in our country. Unfortunately, race still determines too much, often determines where people live, determines what kind of education in their public schools they can get…” (September 26, 2016 – 1st Presidential Debate)

“You know, maybe I can, by speaking directly to white people, say, ‘Look, this is not who we are.’ We’ve got to do everything possible to improve policing, to go right at implicit bias.” (September 20, 2016 - Steve Harvey radio show)

“And here at home, for goodness’s sakes, we have to finally pass a law prohibiting people on the terrorist watch list from being able to buy a gun in the United States of America. So we’ve got work to do. I know we can do that work. I’m meeting with a group of terror experts, counterterrorism experts.” (September 7, 2016 – NBC Commander-In-Chief Forum)

"This [the Dallas shooting] is the kind of call to action, and as president, I would implement the very comprehensive set of proposals that I've been making for more than a year. We must do more to have national guidelines about the use of force by police, especially deadly force. We need to do more to look into implicit bias. We need to do more to respect and protect police.” (July 8, 2016 - Interview on CNN)

"Hillary rejects the false choice between privacy interests and keeping Americans safe.  She was a proponent of the USA Freedom Act, and she supports Senator Mark Warner and Representative Mike McCaul’s idea for a national commission on digital security and encryption.  This commission will work with the technology and public safety communities to address the needs of law enforcement, protect the privacy and security of all Americans that use technology, assess how innovation might point to new policy approaches, and advance our larger national security and global competitiveness interests." (June 27, 2016 - Hillary Clinton's Initiative on Technology and Innovation)

In support of banning individuals on the "No Fly List" from purchasing guns, Clinton said "Surely the terrorist attacks in San Bernardino and Orlando that took so many lives are a call for compromise, a plea for bipartisan action..Essentially, we believe if you are too dangerous to fly on an airplane, you are too dangerous to buy a gun.” (June 21, 2016 - News Conference)

"The legislation Republicans blocked, the so-called no-fly list [loophole], would have prevented suspected terrorists from buying guns...It allows the FBI and the attorney general from preventing a suspected terrorist from doing that. It would happen on a case-by-case basis." (June 13, 2016 - NBC interview)

"We know the gunman used a weapon of war to shoot down at least 50 innocent Americans, and we won’t even be able to get Congress to prevent terrorists or people from the no-fly list from buying guns." (June 13, 2016 - CNN)

"Since 9/11, law enforcement agencies have worked hard to build relationships with Muslim American communities. Millions of peace-loving Muslims live, work and raise their families across America. And they are the most likely to recognize the insidious effects of radicalization before it’s too late, and the best positioned to help us block it. So we should be intensifying contacts in those communities, not scapegoating or isolating them. Last year, I visited a pilot program in Minneapolis that helps parents, teachers, imams, mental health professionals and others recognize signs of radicalization in young people and work with law enforcement to intervene before it’s too late.I’ve also met with local leaders pursuing innovative approaches in Los Angeles and other places. And we need more efforts like that in more cities across America. And as the director of the FBI has pointed out, we should avoid eroding trust in that community, which will only make law enforcement’s job more difficult. Inflammatory anti-Muslim rhetoric and threatening to ban the families and friends of Muslim Americans as well as millions of Muslim business people and tourists from entering our country hurts the vast majority of Muslims who love freedom and hate terror. So does saying that we have to start special surveillance on our fellow Americans because of their religion. It’s no coincidence that hate crimes against American Muslims and mosques have tripled after Paris and San Bernardino. That’s wrong. And it’s also dangerous. It plays right into the terrorists’ hands." (June 13, 2016 - Rally in Cleveland, OH)

"If the FBI is watching you for a suspected terrorist link, you shouldn’t be able to just go buy a gun with no questions asked. And you shouldn’t be able to exploit loopholes and evade criminal background checks by buying online or at a gun show. And yes, if you’re too dangerous to get on a plane, you are too dangerous to buy a gun in America." (June 13, 2016 - Rally in Cleveland, OH)

"We can not fall into the trap set by the gun lobby that says if you can't stop every shooting and every incident you shouldn't try to stop any. That is not how laws work. It's not common sense/ We need to get these weapons of war off the streets. We had an assault weapons ban, it expired, and we need to reinstate it. From San Bernardino to Aurora, Colorado to Sandy Hook and now to Orlando, we have seen the devastation that these military style weapons cause." (June 13, 2016 - Today Show)

“In this particular case, he was interviewed more than once because of reports of what he was saying, yet he had absolutely no trouble walking in and buying an assault weapon. We've got to work together, federal, state, and local government, to get better information into databases that can be used to try to prevent people who pose any kind of threat ... from having easy access to these weapons." (June 13, 2016 - ABC News)

"We know the gunman used a weapon of war to shoot down at least 50 innocent Americans, and we won’t even be able to get Congress to prevent terrorists or people from the no-fly list from buying guns." (June 13, 2016 - CNN)

"To the LGBT community: please know that you have millions of allies across our country. I am one of them. We will keep fighting for your right to live freely, openly and without fear. Hate has absolutely no place in America." (June 12, 2016 - Facebook)

“So it really matters that Donald Trump says things that go against our deepest-held values. It matters when he says he’ll order our military to murder the families of suspected terrorists. During the raid to kill bin Laden, when every second counted, our SEALs took the time to move the women and children in the compound to safety. Donald Trump may not get it, but that’s what honor looks like. (June 2, 2016 - Rally in San Diego, CA)

“He [Trump] has said that he would order our military to carry out torture and the murder of civilians who are related to suspected terrorists – even though those are war crimes.” (June 2, 2016 - Rally in San Diego, CA)

“If there are people or institutions or governments who should be held accountable, that should be part of the bringing to justice anyone or any state that had any role in the horrors of 9/11. We've got to continue to seek the justice that the people who are suing deserve to have." (April 2016 – WABC Radio Interview)

"Last year in Minneapolis I met parents, teachers, Imams and others in the Somali American community who are working with law enforcement and mental health professionals to intervene with young people at risk of being radicalized. Efforts like that deserve more local and national support." (March 23, 2016 - Stanford speech)

"Since 9/11 law enforcement has worked hard to build trustful and strong relationships with american muslim communities. As the Director of theFBI told congress, anything that erodes that trust makes their job more difficult. We need every American community invested in this fight, not fearful and sitting on the sidelines. So when Republican candidates like Ted Cruz call for treating American Muslims like criminals, and for racially profiling predominantly Muslim neighborhoods – it’s wrong, it’s counterproductive, it’s dangerous." (March 23, 2016 - Stanford speech)

"I’m proud to have been part of the administration that banned torture after too many years in which we had lost our way. If I’m president the United States will not condone or practice torture anywhere in the world." (March 23, 2016 - Stanford speech)

"As I wrote last year in a letter to the heads of major American Jewish organizations, we have to be united in fighting back against BDS. Many of its proponents have demonized Israeli scientists and intellectuals, even students. To all the college students who may have encountered this on campus, I hope you stay strong. Keep speaking out. Don’t let anyone silence you, bully you or try to shut down debate, especially in places of learning like colleges and universities." (March 21, 2016 - AIPAC conference speech)

“I agree, the Governor should resign, or be recalled... support the efforts of citizens attempting to achieve that. But, that is not enough. We have to focus on what must be done to help the people of Flint. I support a hundred percent the efforts by your senators and members of congress to get the money from the federal government in order to begin the work that must occur to fix the infrastructure. The state should also be sending money immediately to help this city. I know the state of Michigan has a rainy day fund for emergencies, what is more important than the health and wellbeing of the people, particularly children? It is raining lead in Flint, and the state is derelict in not coming forward with the money that is required. And, we'll get to what we need to do to help the children and the people when I have a little more time because that's just as important as fixing the pipes.”(March 6, 2016 - Flint Michigan Debate)

“We have a higher rate of tested lead in people in Cleveland than in Flint. So I'm not satisfied with just doing everything we must do for Flint. I want to tackle this problem across the board. And if people know about it and they're not acting, and they're in the government at any level, they should be forced to resign.”(March 6, 2016 - Flint Michigan Debate)

“I don't have all the facts, but people should be held accountable wherever that leads. If it leads to resignation, or recall if you're in political office. If it leads to civil penalties, if it leads to criminal responsibility. There has to be an absolute accountability, and I will support whatever the outcome of those investigations are.”(March 6, 2016 - Flint Michigan Debate)

"And we have to take on ISIS online. They are a sophisticated purveyor of propaganda, a celebrator of violence, an instigator of attacks using their online presence. Here at home, we've got to do a better job coordinating between federal, state, and local law enforcement. We need the best possible intelligence not only from our own sources, but from sources overseas, that can be a real-time fusion effort to get information where it's needed. But the final thing I want to say about this is the following. You know, after 9/11, one of the efforts that we did in New York was if you see something or hear something suspicious, report it. And we need to do that throughout the country." (February 11, 2016 - Wisconsin Democratic Debate)

"I do support comprehensive background checks, and to close the gun show loophole, and the online loophole, and what's called the Charleston loophole, and to prevent people on the no-fly list from getting guns. What I am proposing is supported by a great majority of the American people and a significant majority of gun owners." (January 5, 2016 - NBC News)

"We have to stop jihadists from radicalizing new recruits in-person and through social media, chat rooms, and what’s called the “Dark Web.” To do that, we need stronger relationships between Washington, Silicon Valley, and all of our great tech companies and entrepreneurs...  Our security professionals need to more effectively track and analyze ISIS’s social media posts and map jihadist networks, and they need help from the tech community. Companies should redouble their efforts to maintain and enforce their own service agreements and other necessary policies to police their networks, identifying extremist content and removing it." (December 2015, University of Minnesota speech)

"Last night, the Senate voted down a law to block suspected terrorists from buying guns. We have thousands of people on a no-fly list. They get put on there based on credible information and suspicion that they should not be put on a plane inside our country or coming into our country. I got to tell you -- if you’re too dangerous to fly in America, you are too dangerous to buy a gun in America." (December 2015, Iowa campaign event)

"That's why there's a process for people to be able to raise their concerns about being on the list and then to have a process that could even lead to a legal action to remove yourself from the list." (December 2015, CNN)

“If you stand for equal rights, if you stand against discrimination, you don’t just do it once and you’re done. You’ve got to keep fighting for it, and you’ve got to keep standing up for it, and you’ve got to keep moving forward.” (November 2015, MSNBC Democratic Forum)

“We need to ask ourselves: What is happening? What is motivating the kind of violence we’re seeing? And it’s particularly troubling when it’s from a position of authority, whether it’s in a school, or a police officer on the street, but that is not the only place this is happening – it’s happening in our streets.” (November 2015, MSNBC Democratic Forum)

"If Congress refuses to act to end this epidemic of gun violence, I'll take administrative action to do so. -H" (October 5, 2015 - Twitter)

Clinton criticized public officials for "celebrating a county clerk who is breaking the law by denying other Americans their constitutional rights." (October 2015, HRC)

"Democrats believe that no matter who you are, what you look like, what faith you practice, or who you love, we have a place for you and your rights are just as sacred as anybody else's." (August 2015, Summer DNC Meeting)

“Imagine what we would feel and what we would do if white drivers were three times as likely to be searched by police during a traffic stop as black drivers instead of the other way around. If white offenders received prison sentences ten percent longer than black offenders for the same crimes. If a third of all white men – just look at this room and take one-third – went to prison during their lifetime. Imagine that. That is the reality in the lives of so many of our fellow Americans in so many of the communities in which they live.”(August 2015, Washington Post)

"We need to acknowledge some hard truths about race and justice in this country, and one of those hard truths is that that racial inequality is not merely a symptom of economic inequality. Black people across America still experience racism every day." (June 2015, South Carolina interview)

“We have allowed our criminal justice system to get out of balance, and I hope that the tragedies of the last year give us the opportunity to come together as a nation to find our balance again. We can stand up together and say: Yes, black lives matter. Yes, the government should serve and protect all of our people. Yes, our country is strongest when everyone has a fair shot at the American Dream.” (April 2015, Brennan Center for Justice)

“We have to come to terms with some hard truths about race and justice in America. Despite all the progress we have made together, the United States has less than 5 percent of the world’s population, yet we have almost 25 percent of the world’s total prison population” (April 2015, Brennan Center)

“There is something wrong when a third of all black men face the prospect of prison during their lifetimes.  And an estimated 1.5 million black men are quote missing from their families and communities because of incarceration and pre-mature death.  There is something wrong when more than one out of every three young black men in Baltimore cannot find a job.” (April 2015, Baltimore Speech)

“We can’t ignore the inequities that persist in our justice system that undermine our most deeply held values of fairness and equality,”(August 2014, Time)

Surveillance

"So we’ve got to do everything we can to vacuum up intelligence from Europe, from the Middle East. That means we've got to work more closely with our allies. And that’s something that Donald has been very dismissive of. Working with NATO, the longest military alliance in the history of the world, to really turn our attention to terrorism. We’re working with our friends in the Middle East, many of which, as you know, are Muslim majority nations.” (September 26, 2016 – 1st Presidential Debate)

"The recruitment and radicalization that goes on online has to be much more vigorously intercepted and prevented. I have been saying this for quite some time and I believe it's an important part of our strategy...The government cannot do this without the close participation of tech companies and experts online." (September 19, 2016 - news conference)

“We also have to do a better job combating ISIS online, where they recruit, where they radicalize. And I don’t think we’re doing as much as we can. We need to work with Silicon Valley. We need to work with our experts in our government. We have got to disrupt, we have got to take them on in the arena of ideas that, unfortunately, pollute and capture the minds of vulnerable people. So we need to wage this war against ISIS from the air, on the ground, and online, in cyberspace.” (September 7, 2016 – NBC Commander-In-Chief Forum)

"Hillary rejects the false choice between privacy interests and keeping Americans safe.  She was a proponent of the USA Freedom Act, and she supports Senator Mark Warner and Representative Mike McCaul’s idea for a national commission on digital security and encryption.  This commission will work with the technology and public safety communities to address the needs of law enforcement, protect the privacy and security of all Americans that use technology, assess how innovation might point to new policy approaches, and advance our larger national security and global competitiveness interests." (junem 27, 2016 - Hillary Clinton's Initiative on Technology and Innovation)

“We have to a better job intercepting ISIS' communications, tracking and analyzing social media posts and mapping jihadist networks, as well as promoting credible voices who can provide alternatives to radicalization.”  (June 13, 2016 - Rally in Cleveland, OH)

"Since 9/11, law enforcement agencies have worked hard to build relationships with Muslim American communities. Millions of peace-loving Muslims live, work and raise their families across America. And they are the most likely to recognize the insidious effects of radicalization before it’s too late, and the best positioned to help us block it. So we should be intensifying contacts in those communities, not scapegoating or isolating them. Last year, I visited a pilot program in Minneapolis that helps parents, teachers, imams, mental health professionals and others recognize signs of radicalization in young people and work with law enforcement to intervene before it’s too late.I’ve also met with local leaders pursuing innovative approaches in Los Angeles and other places. And we need more efforts like that in more cities across America. And as the director of the FBI has pointed out, we should avoid eroding trust in that community, which will only make law enforcement’s job more difficult. Inflammatory anti-Muslim rhetoric and threatening to ban the families and friends of Muslim Americans as well as millions of Muslim business people and tourists from entering our country hurts the vast majority of Muslims who love freedom and hate terror. So does saying that we have to start special surveillance on our fellow Americans because of their religion. It’s no coincidence that hate crimes against American Muslims and mosques have tripled after Paris and San Bernardino. That’s wrong. And it’s also dangerous. It plays right into the terrorists’ hands." (June 13, 2016 - Rally in Cleveland, OH)

"We also have to use all our capabilities to counter jihadist propaganda online. This is something that I spend a lot of time on at the State Department. As president, I will work with our great tech companies from Silicon Valley to Boston to step up our game. We have to a better job intercepting ISIS’ communications, tracking and analyzing social media posts and mapping jihadist networks, as well as promoting credible voices who can provide alternatives to radicalization." (June 13, 2016 - Rally in Cleveland, OH)

"If the FBI is watching you for a suspected terrorist link, you shouldn’t be able to just go buy a gun with no questions asked. And you shouldn’t be able to exploit loopholes and evade criminal background checks by buying online or at a gun show. And yes, if you’re too dangerous to get on a plane, you are too dangerous to buy a gun in America." (June 13, 2016 - Rally in Cleveland, OH)

"We have to tackle a thorny challenge..navigating the security and civil liberties concerns surrounding the encryption of mobile devices and communications. Impenetrable encryption provides significant cyber security advantages, but may also make it harder for law enforcement and counter terrorism professionals to investigate plots and prevent future attacks.ISIS knows this too. At the same time there are legitimate worries about privacy, network security, and creating new vulnerabilities that bad actors, including terrorists, can exploit." (March 23, 2016 - Stanford speech)

"When other candidates talk about building walls around America, I want to ask them: How high does the wall have to be to keep the Internet out?" (March 23, 2016 - Stanford speech)

"In the Apple case, the FBI may have found a work around, but there will future cases with different facts and different challenges." (March 23, 2016 - Stanford speech)

"Look, I think because this is one of the most difficult dilemmas that we're faced with. Of course law enforcement has every reason to want to get information off of a killer's cellphone. One of the San Bernardino killer's cellphones that they can't open, they're asking for help. Apple, understandably, is worried about opening the door, creating what they call a backdoor into encryption that would not just have to field requests from the United States government, but from the Chinese, Russian, Iranian governments. This is a very hard dilemma. And what I keep calling for is to try to get the government and our great tech companies to figure out what is the path forward? Because I don't know what this judge is going to do in this case. I assume that it'll be appealed. It's going to have lots of ramifications. But I see both sides. And I think most citizens see both sides. We don't want privacy and encryption you know destroyed. And we want to catch and make sure there's nobody else out there whose information is on that cellphone of the killer. So this is why you need people in office who can try to bring folks together to find some common ground. That is exactly what I would do. And I'm well aware that the government has its needs. Obviously Apple and the other tech companies are concerned about this. But as smart as we are, there's got to be some way on a very specific basis we could try to help get information around crimes and terrorism." (February 19, 2016 - MSNBC Las Vegas Townhall)

In response to a question about forcing Apple CEO Tim Cook - and other tech companies - to give law enforcement a key to encrypted technology by making it law, Clinton responded, "I would not want to go to that point. I would hope that, given the extraordinary capacities that the tech community has and the legitimate needs and questions from law enforcement, that there could be a Manhattan-like project, something that would bring the government and the tech communities together to see they're not adversaries, they've got to be partners. It doesn't do anybody any good if terrorists can move toward encrypted communication that no law enforcement agency can break into before or after. There must be some way. I don't know enough about the technology to be able to say what it is, but I have a lot of confidence in our tech experts. And maybe the back door is the wrong door, and I understand what Apple and others are saying about that. But I also understand, when a law enforcement official charged with the responsibility of preventing attacks -- to go back to our early questions, how do we prevent attacks -- well, if we can't know what someone is planning, we are going to have to rely on the neighbor or, you know, the member of the mosque or the teacher, somebody to see something. I just think there's got to be a way, and I would hope that our tech companies would work with government to figure that out. Otherwise, law enforcement is blind -- blind before, blind during, and, unfortunately, in many instances, blind after. So we always have to balance liberty and security, privacy and safety, but I know that law enforcement needs the tools to keep us safe. And that's what i hope, there can be some understanding and cooperation to achieve." (December 19, 2015 - ABC News Debate)

"We have to stop jihadists from radicalizing new recruits in-person and through social media, chat rooms, and what’s called the “Dark Web.” To do that, we need stronger relationships between Washington, Silicon Valley, and all of our great tech companies and entrepreneurs...  Our security professionals need to more effectively track and analyze ISIS’s social media posts and map jihadist networks, and they need help from the tech community. Companies should redouble their efforts to maintain and enforce their own service agreements and other necessary policies to police their networks, identifying extremist content and removing it." (December 2015, University of Minnesota speech)

"Most urgent is stemming the flow of fighters from Europe and America to Iraq and Syria, and then back home again. The United States and our allies need to know the identities of every fighter who makes that trip, and then share information with each other in real time. Right now, European nations don’t always alert each other when they turn away a suspected extremist at the border or when a passport is stolen.  They have to dramatically improve intelligence sharing and counterterrorism cooperation.  And we’re ready to help them do that." (December 2015, University of Minnesota speech)

"Encryption of mobile communications presents a particularly tough problem. We should take the concerns of law enforcement and counterterrorism professionals seriously. They have warned that impenetrable encryption may prevent them from accessing terrorist communications and preventing a future attack." (November 2015, Council on Foreign Relations)

"I firmly believe that he [Edward Snowden] could have gone public and released the information about the collection of information on Americans under whistleblower protection, and he could have done it within the tradition in our country that shields people who come forth acting out of conscience to present information they believe the public should have." Snowden's decision to "steal a lot of information that by any definition had nothing to do with American civil rights, liberties, and privacy, but instead were about terrorists and what other nations, just to name two, Russia and China, do to try to gather information about us and what our government tries to do to prevent that and to try to get information about them." (October 2015, New Hampshire town hall)

“And I began to speak out about their [the Bush administration’s] use of warrantless surveillance and the other behavior that they engaged in. We always have to keep the balance of civil liberties, privacy and security. It's not easy in a democracy, but we have to keep it in mind.” (October 2015, CNN Democratic Debate)

"People were desperate to avoid another attack, and I saw enough intelligence as a senator from New York, and then certainly as secretary [of State], that this is a constant—there are people right this minute trying to figure out how to do harm to Americans and to other innocent people. So it was a debate that needs to happen, so that we make sure that we're not infringing on Americans' privacy, which is a valued, cherished personal belief that we have. But we also had to figure out how to get the right amount of security."(April 2015, National Journal)

"Would you throttle it back?" Well, the NSA has to act lawfully. And we as a country have to decide what the rules are. And then we have to make it absolutely clear that we're going to hold them accountable. What we had because of post-9/11 legislation was a lot more flexibility than I think people really understood, and was not explained to them. I voted against the FISA Amendments in 2008 because I didn't think they went far enough to kind of hold us accountable in the Congress for what was going on....“I think if Americans felt like, number one, you’re not going after my personal information, the context of my personal information. But I do want you to get the bad guys, because I don’t want them to use social media, to use communications devices invented right here to plot against us. So let’s draw the line. And I think it’s hard if everybody’s in their corner. So I resist saying it as to be this or that. I want us to come to a better balance.” (February 2015, The Atlantic)

“Well, I think the NSA needs to be more transparent about what it is doing, sharing with the American people, which it wasn’t. And I think a lot of the reaction about the NSA, people felt betrayed.” (February 2015, Recode Interview)

“The administration’s refrain has been, ‘Trust us.” That’s unacceptable. Their track record doesn’t warrant our trust. Unchecked mass surveillance without judicial review may sometimes be legal but it is dangerous. Every president should save those powers for limited critical situations.” (2008, Associated Press)

Community Policing

“Right now, and this is something Donald has supported, along with the gun lobby. Right now, we've got too many military-style weapons on the streets in a lot of places, our police are outgunned. We need comprehensive background checks and we need to keep guns out of the hands of those who will do harm and we finally need to pass a prohibition on anyone who is on the terrorist watch list from being able to buy a gun in our country. If you are too dangerous to fly, you are too dangerous to buy a gun. So there are things we can do and we ought to do it in a bipartisan way.” (September 26, 2016 – 1st Presidential Debate)

“Who disagrees with keeping neighborhoods safe? But let's also add no one should disagree about respecting the rights of young men who live in those neighborhoods. And so we need to do a better job of working again with the communities, faith communities, business communities, as well as the police to try to deal with this problem.” (September 26, 2016 – 1st Presidential Debate)

“So I have, ever since the first day of my campaign, called for criminal justice reform. I've laid out a platform that I think would begin to remedy some of the problems we have in the criminal justice system. But we also have to recognize in addition to the challenges that we face with policing there are so many good brave police officers who equally want reform. So we have to bring communities together in order to begin working on that as a mutual goal. And we've got to get guns out of the hands of people who shouldn't have them.” (September 26, 2016 – 1st Presidential Debate)

“Stop and risk was found to be unconstitutional. And in part because it was ineffective. It did not do what it needed to do. Now I believe in community policing and in fact violent crime is one half of what it was in 1991; property crime is down 40 percent. We just don't want to see it creep back up.” (September 26, 2016 – 1st Presidential Debate)

“We cannot just say law and order. We have to say, we have to come forward with a plan that is going to divert people from the criminal justice system, deal with mandatory minimum sentences which have put too many people away for too long for doing too little. We need to have more second chance programs. I'm glad that we’re ending private prisons in the federal system. I want to see them ended in the state system.” (September 26, 2016 – 1st Presidential Debate)

“I think implicit bias is a problem for everyone, not just police. I think unfortunately too many of us in our great country jump to conclusions about each other. And therefore I think we need all of us to be asking hard questions about, you know, why am I feeling this way? When it comes to policing, since it can have literally fatal consequences ,I have said in my first budget we would put money into that budget to help us deal with implicit bias by re- training a lot of our police officers. I've met with a group of very distinguished, experienced police chiefs a few weeks ago. They admit it's an issue. They’ve got a lot of concerns. Mental health is one of the biggest concerns because now police are having to handle a lot of really difficult mental health problems on the street. They want support, they want more training, they want more assistance. And I think the federal government could be in a position where we would offer and provide that.” (September 26, 2016 – 1st Presidential Debate)  

"Charlotte should release police video of the Keith Lamont Scott shooting without delay. We must ensure justice & work to bridge divides. --H," (September 23, 2016 - twitter)

“There is still much we don’t know about what happened in both incidents, but we do know we have two more names to add to a list of African-Americans killed by police officers in these encounters,” she said. “It’s unbearable, and it needs to become intolerable.” (September 21, 2016 - Orlando rally)

On the police involved fatality of Terence Crutcher, and unarmed black man, Clinton said "This horrible shooting — again. How many times do we have to see this in our country? In Tulsa? An unarmed man? With his hands in the air? I mean, this is just unbearable and it needs to be intolerable.” (September 20, 2016 - Steve Harvey radio show)

“You know, maybe I can, by speaking directly to white people, say, ‘Look, this is not who we are.’ We’ve got to do everything possible to improve policing, to go right at implicit bias. There are good, honorable, cool-headed police officers. We’ve seen them in action in New York over the last, you know, 48 hours because of the terrorist attack. We can do better. We have got to rein in what is absolutely inexplicable, and we’ve got to have law enforcement respect communities and communities respect law enforcement because they have to work together.” (September 20, 2016 - Steve Harvey radio show)

"It is crucial that we continue to build up trust between law enforcement and Muslim-American communities." (September 19, 2016 - news conference)

“… There are two important steps that I will take as president. First, I will bring law enforcement and communities together to develop national guidelines on the use of force by police officers. We will make it clear for everyone to see when deadly force is warranted, and when it isn’t. And we will emphasize proven methods for de-escalating situations before they reach that point... second, let’s be honest – let’s acknowledge that implicit bias still exists across our society and even in the best police departments. We have to tackle it together, which is why in my first budget, I will commit $1 billion to find and fund the best training programs, support new research, and make this a national policing priority. Let’s learn from those police departments like Dallas that have been making progress, apply their lessons nationwide.”
(July 11, 2016 - A.M.E. Church conference speech in Philadelphia, PA)

“I know that, just by saying all these things together, I may upset some people. I’m talking about criminal justice reform the day after a horrific attack on police officers. I’m talking about courageous, honorable police officers just a few days after officer-involved killings in Louisiana and Minnesota. I’m bringing up guns in a country where merely talking about comprehensive background checks and getting assault weapons off our streets gets you demonized. But all these things can be true at once. We do need police and criminal justice reforms, to save lives and make sure all Americans are treated equally in rights and dignity. We do need to support police departments and stand up for the men and women who put their lives on the line every day to protect us. And we do need to reduce gun violence. We may disagree about how to do all these things, but surely we can all agree with those basic premises.”
(July 11, 2016 - A.M.E. Church conference speech in Philadelphia, PA)

"Well, look, I supported the  (1994) crime bill. My husband has apologized. He was the president who actually signed it, Senator Sanders voted for it. I'm sorry for the consequences that were unintended and that have had a very unfortunate impact on people's lives. I've seen the results of what has happened in families and in communities. That's why I chose to make my very first speech a year ago on this issue, because I want to focus the attention of our country and to make the changes we need to make. And I also want people... especially I want -- I want white people -- I want white people to recognize that there is systemic racism. It's also in employment, it's in housing, but it is in the criminal justice system, as well." (April 14, 2016 - CNN Democratic Debate in Brooklyn)

“On the criminal justice side, look, we've got to have better policing. That means body cameras, that means ending profiling, that means doing everything we can to make sure there's respect between the community and the police.”(March 6, 2016 - Flint Michigan Debate)

"But we have to restore policing that will actually protect the communities that police officers are sworn to protect. And, then we have to go after sentencing, and that's one of the problems here in Wisconsin because so much of what happened in the criminal justice system doesn't happen at the federal level, it happens at the state and local level. But, I would also add this. There are other racial discrepancies. Really systemic racism in this state, as in others, education, in employment, in the kinds of factors that too often lead from a position where young people, particularly young men, are pushed out of school early, are denied employment opportunities. So, when we talk about criminal justice reform, and ending the era of mass incarceration, we also have to talk about jobs, education, housing, and other ways of helping communities." (February 11, 2016 - Wisconsin Democratic Debate)

"So I think that we need to build on the work of the policing commissioner that President Obama impaneled. We need to get a bipartisan commitment to work together on this. And we need to hear the voices of those men and women and boys and girls who feel like strangers in their own country and do whatever is necessary to not only deal with the immediate problems within the criminal justice system, but more opportunities, more jobs, better education so that we can begin to rebuild that very valuable asset known as trust." (December 19, 2015 - ABC News Debate)

"We have to make sure that local law enforcement has the resources and training they need to keep us safe.  And they should be more closely synced up with national counterterrorism experts, including with better use of “fusion centers” that serve as clearing houses for intelligence and coordination." (December 2015, University of Minnesota speech)

"There are millions of peace-loving Muslims living, working, raising families, and paying taxes in our country.  These Americans may be our first, last, and best defense against home grown radicalization and terrorism.  They are the most likely to recognize the insidious effects of radicalization before it’s too late, intervene to help set a young person straight.  They are the best positioned to block anything going forward." (December 2015, University of Minnesota speech)

When asked if certain schools should have police officers, or if all schools should have police officers to eliminate a semblance of racial bias, Clinton said, “Adults should be trained to use nonviolent, non-confrontational measures in dealing with school problems, discipline problems, whatever they might be…I think [police officers in schools] has to be a last resort. I think there can be some people with law enforcement backgrounds who are trained to deal with very difficult situations.” (November 2015, MSNBC Democratic Forum)

“So, what we need to be doing is not only reforming criminal justice -- I have talked about that at some length, including things like body cameras, but we also need to be following the recommendations of the commissioner that President Obama empanelled on policing.” (October 2015, CNN Democratic Debate)

"One of the areas where we have problems is the relationship between communities of color and the police forces who are to protect them. In those police forces now, we have many more police officers who are from different races, different backgrounds, so it’s not only a question of white versus black. It is a question of how force is used, how our law enforcement are trained, what kind of mind-set they have as they go about their daily jobs. I think that President Obama’s policing commission, which has issued a report, has some excellent suggestions. For example, after 9/11, we got really anxious to make sure we had homeland security everywhere. And a lot of military equipment was sold to police departments, and those police departments began to look like they were in a war zone, not protecting the family down the block or the neighborhood community center across town. That sent a very dangerous and threatening message.  There needs to be a constant dialogue between communities and their police officers. And I think a lot of the training has gotten somewhat lax. I don’t feel like police officers are being as well trained as they need to, to try to prevent problems, to try to make it possible to talk with people to end some of the incidents that are going on. I think their first reaction is one of anxiety and nervousness and they overreact. I think we have a lot of work to do. But I take it very seriously, and as president, I would do whatever I could to see what new laws were needed, what new training was needed, what new resources were needed. But ultimately this has to be between the community. They have to respect the police, and the police have to respect the community." (September 2015, Lenny Letter interview

"Look, I don't believe you change hearts. I believe you change laws, you change allocation of resources, you change the way systems operate. You're not going to change every heart. You're not. But at the end of the day, we could do a whole lot to change some hearts and change some systems and create more opportunities for people who deserve to have them, to live up to their own God-given potential." (August 2015, Massachusetts meeting with Black Lives Matter activists)

To the Black Lives Matter movement: “Look, I don't believe you change hearts. I believe you change laws, you change allocation of resources, you change the way systems operate. You're not going to change every heart. You're not. But at the end of the day, we could do a whole lot to change some hearts and change some systems and create more opportunities for people who deserve to have them, to live up to their own God-given potential.” (August 2015, BLM Meeting)

"We can start by making sure that federal funds for state and local law enforcement are used to bolster best practices, rather than to buy weapons of war that have no place on our streets. President Obama's task force on policing gives us a good place to start. Its recommendations offer a roadmap for reform, from training to technology, guided by more and better data." (May 2015, Huffington Post)

“You cannot talk about smart policing and reforming our justice system without talking about what’s needed to improve economic opportunity, better educational chances for young people, more support to families so they can do the best jobs they are capable of doing to help support their own children.” (April 2015, Think Progress)

“Across the country, there are so many police officers out there every day inspiring trust and confidence, honorably doing their duty, putting themselves on the line to save lives…. We need to learn from those examples, build on what works. We can start by making sure that federal funds for state and local law enforcement are used to bolster best practices rather than to buy weapons of war that have no place on our streets.” (April 2015, Baltimore Speech)

“We also have to be honest about the gaps that exist across our country – the inequality that stalks our streets. Because you cannot talk about smart policing and reforming the criminal justice system if you also don’t talk about what’s needed to provide economic opportunity; better educational chances for young people; more support to families so they can do the best jobs they are capable of doing to help support their own children.” (April 2015, Baltimore Speech)

Bigoted Speech: Instances of Condemnation and/or Use

*The Arab American Institute is leading a campaign to hold public officials accountable for their bigoted rhetoric this election cycle. Join us by signing our Pledge to Combat Bigotry, and use #NoBigotry on social media to hold candidates accountable and thank candidates who stand against it.*

“Donald has consistently insulted Muslims abroad, Muslims at home, when we need to be cooperating with Muslim nations and with the American Muslim community. They’re on the frontlines. They can provide information to us that we might not get anywhere else. They need to have close working cooperation with law enforcement in these communities, not be alienated and pushed away as some of Donald’s rhetoric unfortunately has led to.” (September 26, 2016 – 1st Presidential Debate)

Clinton said that Trump is a person “who has said women don't deserve equal pay unless they do as good a job as men and one of the worst things he said was about a woman in a beauty contest, he loves beauty contests, supporting them and hanging around them. And he called this woman Miss Piggy. Then he called her Miss Housekeeping because she was Latina. Donald she has a name.” (September 26, 2016 – 1st Presidential Debate)

"Let us remember there are millions and millions of naturalized citizens in America from all over the world. There are millions of law-abiding peaceful Muslim Americans." (September 19, 2016 - news conference)

"We're going to go after the bad guys, and we're going to get them. But we're not going to go after an entire religion and give ISIS exactly what it's wanting, in order for them to enhance their positions."  (September 19, 2016 - news conference)

"I know there are only 60 days left to make our case -- and don't get complacent, don't see the latest outrageous, offensive, inappropriate comment and think, well, he's done this time. We are living in a volatile political environment. You know, to just be grossly generalistic, you could put half of Trump's supporters into what I call the basket of deplorables. Right? The racist, sexist, homophobic, xenophobic, Islamaphobic -- you name it. And unfortunately there are people like that. And he has lifted them up. He has given voice to their websites that used to only have 11,000 people -- now 11 million. He tweets and retweets their offensive hateful mean-spirited rhetoric. Now, some of those folks -- they are irredeemable, but thankfully they are not America. But the other basket -- and I know this because I see friends from all over America here -- I see friends from Florida and Georgia and South Carolina and Texas -- as well as, you know, New York and California -- but that other basket of people are people who feel that the government has let them down, the economy has let them down, nobody cares about them, nobody worries about what happens to their lives and their futures, and they're just desperate for change. It doesn't really even matter where it comes from. They don't buy everything he says, but he seems to hold out some hope that their lives will be different. They won't wake up and see their jobs disappear, lose a kid to heroin, feel like they're in a dead-end. Those are people we have to understand and empathize with as well." (September 10, 2016 - NYC fundraiser)

"A man with a long history of racial discrimination, who traffics in dark conspiracy theories drawn from the pages of supermarket tabloids and the far reaches of the internet, should never run our government or command our military. (August 25, 2016 – Utah speech)

"Trump said thousands of American Muslims in New Jersey cheered the 9/11 attacks. They didn’t." (August 25, 2016 – Utah speech)

"Ever since the Pilgrims landed on Plymouth Rock, America has distinguished itself as a haven for people fleeing religious persecution. Under Donald Trump, America would distinguish itself as the only country in the world to impose a religious test at the border. Come to think of it, there actually may be one place that does that. It’s the so-called Islamic State. The territory ISIS controls. It would be a cruel irony if America followed its lead." (August 25, 2016 – Utah speech)

"I am not going to demonize and demagogue and declare war on an entire religion, that's just plain dangerous and it plays into ISIS's hand. I think Trump, as usual, is obsessed with name calling. From my perspective, it matters what we do, not what we say. It matters that we got bin Laden, not what name we called him, but if he is somehow suggesting, I don't call this for what it is, he hasn't been listening.” (June 13, 2016 – Today Show)

"To me, radical jihadism, radical Islamism, I think they mean the same thing. I'm happy to say either, but that's not the point. All this talk and demagoguery and rhetoric is not going to solve the problem." (June 13, 2016 – Today Show)

"And through all his loose talk, there’s one constant theme: demonizing Muslims and playing right into the hands of ISIS’. His proposal to ban 1.5 billion Muslims from even coming to our country doesn’t just violate the religious freedom our country was founded on. It’s also a huge propaganda victory for ISIS. And it alienates the very countries we need to actually help us in this fight. A Trump Presidency would embolden ISIS. We cannot take that risk. This isn’t reality television – this is actual reality.” (June 2, 2016 - Rally in San Diego, CA)

"And it also matters when he makes fun of disabled people, calls women pigs, proposes banning an entire religion from our country, or plays coy with white supremacists. America stands up to countries that treat women like animals, or people of different races, religions or ethnicities as less human. What happens to the moral example we set – for the world and for our own children – if our President engages in bigotry? And by the way, Mr. Trump – every time you insult American Muslims or Mexican immigrants, remember that plenty of Muslims and immigrants serve and fight in our armed forces. Donald Trump, Donald Trump could learn something from them." (June 2, 2016 - Rally in San Diego, CA)

"When you run for President of the United States, the entire world is listening and watching. So when you say, "we're going to bar all Muslims," you are sending a dangerous message to the Muslim world. And you're also sending a message to the terrorists. If you go through many of Trump's irresponsible, reckless, dangerous comments, it's not just someone saying something off the cuff. We all misstate things occasionally, but this is a pattern—one that has gone on now for months, and one that adds up. Look at the incredibly difficult work that presidents do, and the decisions that they have to make, and the thinking that goes into those decisions. They have to be carefully parsed and analyzed. Advisors and cabinet members give their opinions, but it is up to the president to decide.

"The United States presidency isn't just another job; it's the hardest job in the world. It requires steadiness as well as strength and smarts. Consider that, and then consider the things Donald Trump has been saying for the past year, and even just the past week: attacking Great Britain; praising the leader of North Korea, a despotic dictator who has nuclear weapons; saying to let other countries have nuclear weapons; and the list goes on. The kinds of positions he is stating and the consequences of those positions and statements are not just offensive and wrong—they are dangerous. And when Trump is consistently offending, insulting, and endangering the people of this country and the world, there's only one conclusion: he is not qualified to be President of the United States." (May 19, 2016 - Facebook)

“I don’t respond to Donald Trump and his string of insults against me. I can take care of myself. I look forward to running against him if he’s the Republican nominee if I am the Democratic nominee. What I am concerned about is how he goes after everybody else," Clinton said. "He goes after women. He goes after Muslims. He goes after immigrants. He goes after people with disabilities. He is hurting our unity at home. He is undermining the values that we stand for in New York and across America, and he’s hurting us around the world.” (April 17,2016 - ABC interview)

"One thing we know that does not work is offensive, inflammatory rhetoric that demonizes all Muslims. There are millions of peace loving Muslims living, working, raising families, and paying taxes in this country. These Americans are a crucial line of defense against terrorism. They are the most likely to recognize the warning signs of radicalization before it’s too late, and the best positioned to block it." (March 23, 2016 - Stanford speech)

Following the terrorist attacks in Brussels, Clinton tweeted "We can be strong and smart without advocating torture or bigotry. We will not let fear dictate our foreign policy." (March 22, 2016 - Twitter)

"we need to understand that American Muslims are on the front line of our defense. They are more likely to know what's happening in their families and their communities, and they need to feel not just invited, but welcomed within the American society. So when somebody like Donald Trump and others... stirs up the demagoguery against American Muslims, that hurts us at home. It's not only offensive; it's dangerous. And the same goes for overseas, where we have to put together a coalition of Muslim nations. I know how to do that. I put together the coalition that imposed the sanctions on Iran that got us to the negotiating table to put a lid on their nuclear weapons program."  (February 11, 2016 - Wisconsin Democratic Debate)

"And you don't go tell Muslim nations you want them to be part of a coalition when you have a leading candidate for president of the United States who insults their religion."  (February 11, 2016 - Wisconsin Democratic Debate)

"We need to be united against the threats that we face. We need to have everybody in our country focused on watching what happens and reporting it if it's suspicious, reporting what you hear. Making sure that Muslim Americans don't feel left out or marginalized at the very moment when we need their help. And we also need to make sure that the really discriminatory messages that Trump is sending around the world don't fall on receptive ears. He is becoming ISIS's best recruiter. They are going to people showing videos of Donald Trump insulting Islam and Muslims in order to recruit more radical jihadists. So I want to explain why this is not in America's interest to react with this kind of fear and respond to this sort of bigotry." (December 19, 2015 - ABC News Debate)

"I worry greatly that the rhetoric coming from the Republicans, particularly Donald Trump, is sending a message to Muslims here in the United States and literally around the world that there is a "clash of civilizations," that there is some kind of Western plot or even "war against Islam," which then I believe fans the flames of radicalization. So guns have to be looked at as its own problem, but we also have to figure out how we're going to deal with the radicalization here in the United States." (December 19, 2015 - ABC News Debate)

"To all our Muslim-American brothers and sisters, this is your country too.  And I am proud to be your fellow American." (December 2015, University of Minnesota speech)

“To Muslim Americans: What you’re hearing from Trump and other Republicans is absolutely, unequivocally wrong. It’s inconsistent with our values as a nation — a nation which you are helping to build. This is your country too. I’m proud to be your fellow American. And many, many other Americans feel the same way.” (December 2015, Medium)

“Declaring war on Islam or demonizing Muslim Americans is not only counter to our values—it plays right into the hands of terrorists.” (December 2015, Twitter)

“It’s important to remember… the vast majority of Muslim Americans are just as concerned and heartbroken about this as anyone else. No matter what motivation these killers, these murderers had we can say one thing for certain: They should not have been able to do this.” (December 2015, New Hampshire speech)

"The obsession in some quarters with a clash of civilizations or repeating the specific words ‘radical Islamic terrorism’ isn’t just a distraction. It gives these criminals, these murderers, more standing than they deserve. It actually plays into their hands by alienating partners we need by our side.” (November 2015, Council on Foreign Relations)

"We need to say in one voice that transgender people are valued. They are loved. They are us.” (October 2015, HRC)

“[Donald Trump] is fueling a level of paranoia and prejudice against all kinds of people. And when you light those fires, you better recognize that they can get out of control.” (September 2015, Face the Nation interview)

"Donald Trump not denouncing false statements about POTUS & hateful rhetoric about Muslims is disturbing, & just plain wrong. Cut it out. -H" (September 2015, Twitter)

In response to the arrest of Ahmed Mohamed, a 14 year old boy who invented a clock and brought it to school, Clinton tweeted, "Assumptions and fear don't keep us safe—they hold us back. Ahmed, stay curious and keep building." (September 2015, @HillaryClinton)

"We are not going to stand by when they [Republicans] demonize immigrants, whether they are Asian, Latino, or anything else." (August 2015, Summer DNC Meeting)

In response to a Jeb Bush quote regarding an alternate term for 'anchor babies', Hillary replied, "How about "babies," "children," or "American citizens." (August 2015, @HillaryClinton)

“It’s tempting to dismiss a tragedy like this as an isolated incident, to believe that in today’s America bigotry is largely behind us, that institutionalized racism no longer exists. But despite our best efforts and our highest hopes, America’s long struggle with race is far from finished.” (June 2015, Conference of Mayors)

"We’re not contesting against the vast majority of Muslims, who are peaceful and tolerant people. But we can’t close our eyes to the fact that at this time in our world history, there is a distorted and dangerous strain of extremism within the Muslim world that continues to spread.” (January 2015, LA Times)

Immigration Reform

"I am absolutely in favor of and have long been an advocate for tough vetting for making sure that we don't let people into this country...We need a better visa system. Let's remember what happened on 9/11. These were not refugees who got into airplanes and attacked our city and our country."" (September 19, 2016 - NYC press event)

"Ever since the Pilgrims landed on Plymouth Rock, America has distinguished itself as a haven for people fleeing religious persecution. Under Donald Trump, America would distinguish itself as the only country in the world to impose a religious test at the border. Come to think of it, there actually may be one place that does that. It’s the so-called Islamic State. The territory ISIS controls. It would be a cruel irony if America followed its lead. (August 25, 2016 – Utah speech)

"Our immigration system is plagued by visa backlogs and other barriers that prevent high-skilled workers and entrepreneurs from coming to, staying in, and creating jobs in America. Far too often, we require talented persons from other countries who are trained in U.S. universities to return home, rather than stay in here and continue to contribute to our economy. As part of a comprehensive immigration solution, Hillary would “staple” a green card to STEM masters and PhDs from accredited institutions—enabling international students who complete degrees in these fields to move to green card status. Hillary will also support “start-up” visas that allow top entrepreneurs from abroad to come to the United States, build companies in technology-oriented globally traded sectors, and create more jobs and opportunities for American workers. Immigrant entrepreneurs would have to obtain a commitment of financial support from U.S. investors before obtaining the visa, and would have to create a certain number of jobs and reach performance benchmarks in order to pursue a green card." (June 27, 2016 - Hillary Clinton's Initiative on Technology and Innovation)

"Today’s deadlocked decision from the Supreme Court is unacceptable, and show us all just how high the stakes are in this election. As I have consistently said, I believe that President Obama acted well within his constitutional and legal authority in issuing the DAPA and DACA executive actions." (June 23, 2016 - Politico)

“I think also, though, there’s a lot of evidence that moving toward comprehensive immigration reform with a path to citizenship would be good for our economy. We already know that undocumented workers are putting about $12 billion into the Social Security trust fund with no anticipation at this point that they’ll ever get anything out. They’re paying payroll taxes; they’re paying other forms of taxes — state and local as well as federal.” (June 22, 2016 - Interview with Ezra Klein for Vox)

“I think it would be very difficult to do anything on immigration until we make the decision that there will be comprehensive immigration reform. Because otherwise we are mixing up a lot of the concerns about immigration in a way that I think will hurt both the immigrants who fill jobs we need, particularly high-value jobs, and the people who are here living in fear that someone’s going to round them up and deport them. But I don’t want to mix that with other kinds of changes in visas and other concerns that particularly high-value technical companies have. In fact, I think keeping the pressure on them helps us resolve the bigger problem, and then we can look to see what else, if anything, can and should be done.” (June 22, 2016 - Interview with Ezra Klein for Vox)

"We're going to end raids and round-ups. We're going to keep families together. We know we've got work to do but I think winning the election will really set that in motion, don't you?" (May 5, 2016 – Campaign Rally, Los Angeles, CA)

“I would create the first ever Office of Immigrant Affairs...that would build on the work of the Obama administration’s task force, and create a dedicated place in the White House to coordinate immigration policies across the federal government and with state and local government as well.” (April 13, 2016 - campaign speech)

"In too many communities, immigrants still face significant language, education, and economic barriers that prevent them from fully adjusting in their new home. Given the cross-cutting nature of immigrant integration policy concerns, Hillary believes it is critical that there be a pro-active effort to coordinate policies and programs across federal agencies and with state and local governments. In 2014, the Obama Administration announced a Task Force to study integration services and make recommendations for improvements.  Hillary would work to implement the Task Force’s recommendations, and create the first ever federal Office of Immigrant Affairs to ensure there is a dedicated place in the White House where integration services for immigrants and refugees are managed." (April 14, 2016 - hillaryclinton.com)

“My priorities are to deport violent criminals, terrorists, and anyone who threatens our safety. So I do not have the same policy as the current administration does. I think it's important that we move to our comprehensive immigration reform, but at the same time, stop the raids, stop the round-ups, stop the deportation of people who are living here doing their lives, doing their jobs, and that's my priority.” (March 9, 2016 - Univision Debate)

“In 2003, I sponsored the DREAMER (sic) Act. I sponsored I think in every Congress after that. I have been consistent and committed to comprehensive immigration reform with a path to citizenship.” (March 9, 2016 - Univision Debate)

“I only hope that we can put together a coalition to pass comprehensive immigration reform in the next Congress.” (March 9, 2016 - Univision Debate)

"I strongly support the president's executive actions. I hope the Supreme Court upholds them. I think there is Constitutional and legal authority for the President to have done what he did... [But] I am against the raids. I'm against the kind of inhumane treatment that is now being visited upon families, waking them up in the middle of the night, rounding them up. We should be deporting criminals, not hardworking immigrant families who do the very best they can and often are keeping economies going in many places in our country." (February 11, 2016 - Wisconsin Democratic Debate)

There’s a lot we have to do on immigration reform, on voting rights, on campaign finance reform, but we need to do it together.” (January 17, 2016 - Washington Post)

“There is no place in America for second-class citizenship. We can’t wait any longer for comprehensive Immigration reform. #GOPdebate” (October 2015, @HillaryClinton)

“I want to support states that are expanding health care and including undocumented children and others. I want to open up the opportunity for immigrants to be able to buy in to the exchanges under the Affordable Care Act.” (October 2015, CNN Democratic Debate)

"The deportation laws were interpreted and enforced very aggressively during the last six and a half years, which I think his administration did in part to try to get Republicans to support comprehensive immigration reform. It was part of a strategy. I think that strategy is no longer workable. So, therefore, I think we have to go back to being a much less harsh and aggressive enforcer." (October 2015, Telemundo Interview)

“I would do everything possible under the law to go even further – there are more people, like many parents of Dreamers, and others with deep ties and contribution to our communities who deserve a chance to stay, and I would fight for them.” (May 2015, Politico)

“So I will fight for comprehensive immigration reform and a path to citizenship for you and for families across our country. I will fight to stop partisan attacks on the executive actions that would put DREAMers—including many with us today—at risk of deportation.And, if Congress refuses to act, as President I will do everything possible under the law to go even further. There are more people—like many parents of DREAMers and others with deep ties and contributions to our communities—who deserve a chance to stay. I’ll fight for them too.” (May 2015, Hillaryclinton.com)